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Parasites on the Brain

Article #113 • Written by Cynthia Wood

Toxoplasma gondii may be the most prevalent human parasite. As many as 50% of humans worldwide, and up to 80% in urban areas, have been infected with it at some time in their lives. An estimated 60 million people in the US have active cases at any given time. It’s a single celled parasite whose favored host is cats. However it can infect and live in a host of other creatures including rats and humans. Most infected people, and most infected rats, show no particular signs of illness when infected. They continue on with their daily life and work completely unaware they’ve been parasitized. But they may not be as unaffected as they seem.

There are some interesting studies showing striking behavior differences between rats that have been infected with Toxoplasma and those that haven’t. Normal rats are very reactive to the smell of cat urine – an unsurprising survival instinct. If they encounter cat urine in their environment they have an extreme fear reaction, and they will avoid that spot thereafter. Rats infected with Toxoplasma don’t do this. They have no fear reaction to the smell of cat pee; they don’t avoid the areas where they smell it. In fact some of the studied rats preferentially returned to the sites where they had smelled the urine. It’s hard to see how this could benefit the rat, but easy to see how it could benefit Toxoplasma, which could return to its preferred host to complete its life cycle if the rat gets eaten.

Now consider that statistic from the first paragraph again. Up to one half of humans worldwide are, or have been, infected with Toxoplasma. Can something that affects the behavior of one mammalian host so drastically have no effect on the other?

The answer has always been no for some people. A small minority of people have strong psychological effects from toxoplasmosis, including delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia. The

majority of the infected however, show no such drastic symptoms. Most people with toxoplasmosis have no idea they’re infected, but that doesn’t mean that they’re unaffected. At Charles University in Prague, parasitologist Jeroslav Flegr administered psychological tests to people infected with Toxoplasma, and compared them to a control group. He found alterations in the psychology of the infected individuals that seemed to be gender-based. Infected men appeared more jealous and suspicious. Infected women appeared more warm-hearted and outgoing. Both sexes seemed to be more self-reproachful than the control group.

Those results are fairly subtle. E. Fuller Torrey of the Stanley Medical Research Institute has found evidence of some that may be more drastic. Toxoplasma is associated with damage to the brain’s astrocytes – glial cells that function as an interface between neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Astrocyte damage has also been associated with schizophrenia. Now add in that pregnant women with high levels of Toxoplasma antibodies are more likely to have children who later develop schizophrenia, and you have something to give most people pause. Torrey’s study also found that some of the drugs used to treat schizophrenia have an inhibiting effect on Toxoplasma growth.

What exactly the connection is between Toxoplasma and schizophrenia has not been determined, though it seems clear there is one. What alterations Toxoplasma makes to human psychology in general is even more unclear. What is abundantly clear is that whatever those alterations are, they affect a huge number of people. Can we afford to be as ignorant of them as we currently are?

Article written by Cynthia Wood, published on 08 February 2006. Cynthia is a contributing editor for DamnInteresting.com.

Edited by Alan Bellows.

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50 Comments
Arby
Posted 08 February 2006 at 11:10 am

Will a tin foil hat prevent infection?

*puts on hat*


the100thmonkey
Posted 08 February 2006 at 12:03 pm

this is _astonishing_.

the repercussions of this are very interesting:

where does depression stand in the equation? how does the bug accomplish the personality changes? does psychology alteration in humans affect its survival chances?

it could also provide a very interesting insight into the workings of the human brain (obviously), but could shed light on issues like the biochemistry of self-image.

the thing is, if there's one of something, there's usually more.

being fat has a pathogenic source (in some), now over self-criticism...

i'm sure i've read a story about this kind of thing...


kungfoofool
Posted 08 February 2006 at 12:14 pm

What exactly will prevent infections? Is there a cure? Should I get rid of the cat?


the100thmonkey
Posted 08 February 2006 at 12:22 pm

not having a cat. i dunno. probably. i hate my cat anyway.


Josh Harding
Posted 08 February 2006 at 01:30 pm

Maybe this would explain why we have cats as pets. Darn that parasite. I think the parasite makes us like the rats allowing us to tolerate cats instead of tossing out the ungrateful parasitic felines that our wives drag home.


simple mind
Posted 08 February 2006 at 02:56 pm

There is a correlation, not a connection. Did that study take into account the type of people who own cats vs those who don't? Were all the people tested cat owners, infected and not infected? The differences in personality could be associated with pet preference. I do think that more research should be done.

High levels of antibodies doesn't mean high level of infection. It could be an over-active immune system which can also damage the brain. It's better to do more research before trying to scare the public.


IknowIknowNothing
Posted 08 February 2006 at 03:28 pm

You think that's scary? Here are a few more parasite facts: In 1976, a nationwide survey (US) by the Centers for Disease Control revealed that 1 in every 6 people selected at random had one or more parasites. yum.

The homepage called Parasites of Vertebrates by the Department of Nematology, University of California-Davis, says that 900 million people worldwide are infected with hookworm, and some 4% to 15% of the pop. in the Southeastern United States. Some one billion people (1/4 of the world's pop.) are infected with roundworm, and 500 million people worldwide are infected with pinworm. In the United States, estimates of those infected with pinworm range from 10% to 35% of the population.
Most people don't even know they have one (er, or two). Take, oh, me, for example. I had leishmaniasis (your everyday flesh eating parasite) for a few months before I knew it. Granted, I have been living in Panama for the last 5 months, but not in the jungle. In the CITY. So of course, most people don't ask their doctor to regulary check 'em over for bugs, and doctor's don't run tests they don't think they need to. SO, people suffering from constipation, diarrhea, gas and bloating, irritable bowel syndrome, joint and muscle aches and pains, anemia, allergies, skin conditions, nervousness, sleep disturbances, teeth grinding, and chronic fatigue, may go untreated. That's right, parasites can cause all those things.
One doctor says: "I have observed that many unexplained health conditions often disappeared when parasites were eliminated from the body. These conditions included environmental illness, skin problems, digestive problems, excessive fatigue, hypoglycemia, arthritic-like aches and pains, long-standing obesity, and even depression."
Now that's something to look into.


simple mind
Posted 08 February 2006 at 03:55 pm

There are some researchers that argue that having parasites was a natural state of the human condition and the the lack of exposure to them could partly be responsible for the rise in people with allergies and auto-immune diseases.
I've had pin worms before as a child (believe me, you would know if you had them). Perhaps parents should encourage their kids to go play in the ditch. That would be hilarious in this modern anti-bacterial everything society.


Cynthia Wood
Posted 08 February 2006 at 04:46 pm

Simple mind - connection isn't causation any more than correlation is. Whatever is going on with Toxoplasma and human psychology, it's pretty obviously not dramatically dangerous or we'd have noticed by now. On the other hand I find the notion that human parasites probably affect human behavior in much the same way other parasites affect their hosts' behavior to be fascinating and not much thought about. We humans don't like to think that things like this may be altering our behavior.


Marius
Posted 08 February 2006 at 04:54 pm

Having just acquired two adorable strays I had cause to investigate Toxoplasmosis. The aformentioned studies aside, the general consensus is that only pregnant women, very young children, and those with compromised immune systems need worry. And even then the little buggers are transmitted via kitty poops, and they need to be outside the host animal for at least a day before they become infectious. So...pause for breath...so long as you are healthy, not pregnant, and clean the catbox regularly there is little to fear.

As proof I submit that I have lived with cats since birth, and I still hate the smell of cat pee. ;-)


white_matter
Posted 08 February 2006 at 05:48 pm

I didn't think that I needed another reason to hate cats. Now I have it. Thanks guys, damn interesting.


Secret Ninja
Posted 08 February 2006 at 06:59 pm

Cats really do suck quite a bit.


electricmonk500
Posted 08 February 2006 at 07:19 pm

Maybe this explains the "crazy cat lady" phenomenon. You never hear about crazy dog ladies, or crazy parakeet ladies.


Oax
Posted 08 February 2006 at 07:45 pm

I know a guy who's a schizo and I've always wanted to try that...gotta go. off to the pet store.


RandomAction
Posted 08 February 2006 at 09:21 pm

Simple Mind said in part:

High levels of antibodies doesn't mean high level of infection. It could be an over-active immune system which can also damage the brain. It's better to do more research before trying to scare the public.

The scientists would be looking for specific antibodies produced in response to infection with this parasite, rather than just high levels of antibodies.

Anyhoo here is a rather nice article:

A year later, Torrey and his colleagues discovered one more fascinating link. They raised human cells in Petri dishes and infected them with Toxoplasma. Then they dosed the cells with a variety of drugs used to treat schizophrenia. Several of the drugs--most notably haloperidol--blocked the growth of the parasite.


Stuart
Posted 09 February 2006 at 03:15 am

"Maybe this explains the "crazy cat lady" phenomenon. You never hear about crazy dog ladies."

Maybe this is true but I reckon its a bit crazy to follow an animal around, picking his crap up in a bag and then taking him home to wreck the furniture and drool all over your new jeans. And yeah, I do have cats but they both hate me passionately and, damnit, i respect them for it.


RandomAction
Posted 09 February 2006 at 03:30 am

Stuart I already said I was sorry about the dam jeans, do really have to keep on bringing it up? And as for picking up my crap, well I didn't ask you to do it now did I.
Yours Sincerly [stop following me around with those plastic bags]
RandomAction


Stuart
Posted 09 February 2006 at 03:49 am

Look its not really about the jeans (although i did have to walk around trouserless that day because of it) i've gotten over that now. But if you're gonna keep dropping turds in the middle of the street well i don't really have much choice do i. Someones gotta clean it up and its obviously not gonna be you. Now squat still so i can get the bag in position!


psients
Posted 09 February 2006 at 11:57 am

This is a very bad article.

Horrendous. Absolutely horrible. Do you know what paranoia is? Paranoia is thinking that you have parasites in your brain causing your paranoia.

This cat garbage comes up about once every 3 months. Over half the people in the world have it. That means if it's not your friend, it's you.

Thank goodness that more than half of humanity actually is not paranoid. Otherwise this story wouldn't catch on. Get it?


originalgeek
Posted 09 February 2006 at 12:03 pm

Cats have a very short opportunity of passing the virus, and only through their feces. Take a moment to get clued:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/toxoplasmosis/factsht_toxoplasmosis.htm

Of course, if you fear a government conspiracy is trying to control your mind via Toxoplasma, this link will be of little us to you. Best stock up on foil.


neurokaotix
Posted 09 February 2006 at 01:18 pm

"in the Southeastern United States. Some one billion people (1/4 of the world's pop.) are infected with roundworm"

A) There aren't one billion people in the Southeastern part of the United States, there is around-the-area of 300 million people total in the United States.

B) 1 billion is roughly 1/6 of the worlds population, last estimated to be about 6.5 billion people total.


IknowIknowNothing
Posted 09 February 2006 at 03:15 pm

neurokaotix said: ""in the Southeastern United States. Some one billion people (1/4 of the world's pop.) are infected with roundworm"

A) There aren't one billion people in the Southeastern part of the United States, there is around-the-area of 300 million people total in the United States.

You're right! There's not! Check out that cool little period at the end of "in the Southeastern United States." That's part of the last sentance. It's 1 billion worldwide. And as for the math being wrong, probably the stats are older, or, the person who figured them out was just bad at math.


vranghel
Posted 09 February 2006 at 06:54 pm

IknowIknowNothing said:
"The homepage called Parasites of Vertebrates by the Department of Nematology, University of California-Davis, says that 900 million people worldwide are infected with hookworm, and some 4% to 15% of the pop. in the Southeastern United States. Some one billion people (1/4 of the world's pop.) are infected with roundworm, and 500 million people worldwide are infected with pinworm. In the United States, estimates of those infected with pinworm range from 10% to 35% of the population."

Talking about the infamous hookworm:

How do I get a hookworm infection?

You can become infected by direct contact with contaminated soil, generally through walking barefoot, or accidentally swallowing contaminated soil.

Hookworms have a complex life cycle that begins and ends in the small intestine. Hookworm eggs require warm, moist, shaded soil to hatch into larvae. These barely visible larvae penetrate the skin (often through bare feet), are carried to the lungs, go through the respiratory tract to the mouth, are swallowed, and eventually reach the small intestine. This journey takes about a week. In the small intestine, the larvae develop into half-inch-long worms, attach themselves to the intestinal wall, and suck blood. The adult worms produce thousands of eggs. These eggs are passed in the feces (stool). If the eggs contaminate soil and conditions are right, they will hatch, molt, and develop into infective larvae again after 5 to 10 days.

What is pinworm infection?

This infection is caused by a small, white intestinal worm called Enterobius vermicularis (EN-ter-O-be-us ver-MIK-u-lar-is). Pinworms are about the length of a staple and live in the rectum of humans. While an infected person sleeps, female pinworms leave the intestines through the anus and deposit eggs on the surrounding skin. Pinworm eggs are infective within a few hours after being deposited on the skin. They can survive up to 2 weeks on clothing, bedding, or other objects. You or your children can become infected after accidentally ingesting (swallowing) infective pinworm eggs from contaminated surfaces or fingers. At night, the adult worms can sometimes be seen directly in bedclothes or around the anal area.

And the winner is....

Ascariasis (roundworm)

Ascariasis is the most common human worm infection. Infection occurs worldwide and is most common in tropical and subtropical areas where sanitation and hygiene are poor. Children are infected more often than adults. In the United States, infection is rare, but most common in rural areas of the southeast.

Information taken from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/default.htm


wishistillknewnothin
Posted 09 February 2006 at 07:46 pm

I suppose i now know why i've been following cats around, feeding the danged things and cleaning up their messes for so long. This probably explains the prevalence of the little bitches among human homes.

The little buggers likely foresaw Vonnegut's Protocol of the Elders of Trafalmador and built their own bug. But instead undergoing the human world-rule-delusion torture test in order to be able to survive space travel, the cats simply settled for a bug that made mammals like cats. Then, presto zolce, the smartass little cunts have been able to kick back since Cleopatra with us pampering them even while they piss in our shoes.

How could we have been so dumb?!? Then again, they say Hitler munched on his carpets while jacking speed and folks still followed him; Bush is still in Washington...


JustAnotherName
Posted 10 February 2006 at 01:37 pm

My cat is healthier than I am. I hope I don't make him sick.


twyls
Posted 15 February 2006 at 08:31 pm

Okay, so I'm rather sick with a sinus infection, and not a whole lot is making sense to me at the moment, but I think I'm a bit disturbed by this article. There is very little sign of mental illness in my family, and certainly no schizophrenia. Until me. The doctors all were rather confused when I developed the disorder, as there is little in my genetic or personal history to have predicted it. But now, according to this article, it could be that my mom, or myself, was infected by a brain parasite? Does anyone know how or where to get tested for the bugs? 'Cause I'd love to know that this is the source of my disability.

Oh, and hi. I'm new to this site.

twyls


DJ.Mac
Posted 17 February 2006 at 01:15 pm

If cats are better hosts than humans,it would seem logicial to own one or two cats. Therefore the cats would be more likely to become infected with the parasite than the owners. Just make sure you stay seperated from the cats.

DJ.Mac


Stead311
Posted 23 February 2006 at 03:18 pm

TV, giver of all knowledge, enlightened me to a similar occurance. There is a parasite that infects certain snails. It "tells" the snail to crawl into the open, (whereas snails usually stay where it is cold and moist) thus making them more vulnerable to birds. The parasite thrives significantly better once it is in the brain of a bird. How interesting that the smallest things in nature have a rather scary ability to command those organisms which are bigger and much more intelligent than them.


foff@handbag.com
Posted 24 February 2006 at 04:59 am

I contacted flegr a few years back he said:

"Don't vary" that he tested it on a large group...

I went for a toxoplasma exam tricky thing is that in the medical world, having a toxoplasma count is "normal" because this means that you don't have an abnormal count. (When the parasite first infects you it tricks your body into fighting it by producing at a superfast rate, which makes you get sick)

So when I asked for the results, the doctor said I was normal (I didn't know if that meant I had the parasite or not)

In any case, it's impossible to get rid of this parasite - perhaps another (mis)step of human evolution.


gamesecretary.com
Posted 25 March 2006 at 01:54 am

Is there any way to get rid of this parasite? Are there any positive indicators for being infected by this parasite, for example there are tests going on now to see if hookworm infections can be useful against ashthma and crohn's.


Dementia
Posted 26 March 2006 at 11:38 am

This is probably one of the most interesting articles on here. Really freaked me out. Maybe this is why the human race is so screwed up. You have to wonder about the distribution of this bug... 88% of French people are infected, says Wikipedia, and plenty of people think of the French as raving midgets... I know that cats are really popular in Russia, and everyone over here thinks of them as nuts, so maybe there's a correlation there too.


vitualis
Posted 28 March 2006 at 07:58 pm

There is just a little bit of hysteria and misinformation in the comments here... ;-)

http://vitualis.blogspot.com/2006/02/toxoplasma-and-schizophrenia.html

Toxoplasma infection generally does not cause a problem in humans; except in perhaps pregnant women (with regards to the foetus) and the immunocompromised (specifically, people with AIDS). Treatment of disseminated toxoplasmosis or toxoplasma encephalitis is NOT with haloperidol - rather, an antimicrobial agent. As per the "Antibiotic Therapeutic Guidelines" (Australian), it is treated with:

sulfadiazine 1 to 1.5 g orally/IV 6-hourly for 3 to 6 weeks PLUS pyrimethamine 50 to 100 mg orally initially, THEN 25 to 50 mg daily for 3 to 6 weeks

If hypersensitive to sulfadiazine, substitute clindamycin 600 mg orally/IV 6-hourly for 3 to 6 weeks

Furthermore, cats have been somewhat maligned in terms of human toxoplasma infection. Most infections are probably caused be the consumption of undercooked meat (with toxoplasma cysts). Hence the higher rate of exposure / infection in the French. They don't like cats any more than any other group the French are more likely to eat their steaks as rare and medium.

Michael Tam : vitualis' Medical Rants


The_Smurf_Strangler
Posted 03 April 2006 at 12:07 pm

This sounds like the making of an awesome conspiracy theory. I'll definately buy tickets to the movie.

Stead311 said: "TV, giver of all knowledge, enlightened me to a similar occurance. There is a parasite that infects certain snails. It "tells" the snail to crawl into the open, (whereas snails usually stay where it is cold and moist) thus making them more vulnerable to birds. The parasite thrives significantly better once it is in the brain of a bird. How interesting that the smallest things in nature have a rather scary ability to command those organisms which are bigger and much more intelligent than them."

The g-man could come up with parasites to make us do all sorts of entertaining/evil things. Yikes


Lennes
Posted 30 August 2006 at 02:30 pm

electricmonk500 said: "Maybe this explains the "crazy cat lady" phenomenon. You never hear about crazy dog ladies, or crazy parakeet ladies."

g'Damnit, you beat me to it. Admittedly, I'm a little late. But still..


melanie
Posted 21 September 2006 at 01:23 am

I can't believe how stupid people can be. How many stories have I seen on the news about people who horde crates and crates and crates of dogs in their campers and such but there is no such thing as a crazy dog lady...and there is also no such thing as the blindman either, right. You know, the asshole.

Toxoplasmosis is everywhere. It's probably in the dirt on the bottom of your shoes but kick the cat to the curb and go fill your fat pie holes with your stinkin pork chops that your poor lonely wives have to cook for your asses and welcome to the parasite that is the leading cause of seizures when the larvea of tapeworms get in your brain. that's right...I said the leading cause of seizures. Would you like me to repeat that again for those of you who probably know more than one person with seizures who have a fat slobbering mouth full of your wifes baked ham you freaking morons.
The life on the whole world was made from microscopic organisms but come across one virtually harmless parasite among millions that just so happens to replicate within a cat despite being EVERYWHERE and god only knows what's living inside YOU and death to Fluffy.
Genuis! freaking Genius!
I hope your wives leave you for a guy who owns a cat you brain parasite infected primates.


melanie
Posted 21 September 2006 at 01:31 am

A lot of people in France have it?

Funny....they used to kill cats over there because they thought they were evil and their whole society was being run by a bunch zealot pigs anyway who burned "witches" who probably just knew too much about their sex lives...then the rat population goes up and they get the plague from the brown rat flea.

You know what that is you wife beater wearing morons? That's FLUFFY'S REVENGE.


Tink
Posted 01 October 2006 at 09:09 pm

melanie said: "I can't believe how stupid people can be. How many stories have I seen on the news about people who horde crates and crates and crates of dogs in their campers and such but there is no such thing as a crazy dog lady…and there is also no such thing as the blindman either, right. You know, the asshole.


Toxoplasmosis is everywhere. It's probably in the dirt on the bottom of your shoes but kick the cat to the curb and go fill your fat pie holes with your stinkin pork chops that your poor lonely wives have to cook for your asses and welcome to the parasite that is the leading cause of seizures when the larvea of tapeworms get in your brain. that's right…I said the leading cause of seizures. Would you like me to repeat that again for those of you who probably know more than one person with seizures who have a fat slobbering mouth full of your wifes baked ham you freaking morons.
The life on the whole world was made from microscopic organisms but come across one virtually harmless parasite among millions that just so happens to replicate within a cat despite being EVERYWHERE and god only knows what's living inside YOU and death to Fluffy.
Genuis! freaking Genius!
I hope your wives leave you for a guy who owns a cat you brain parasite infected primates."

melanie said: "A lot of people in France have it?

Funny….they used to kill cats over there because they thought they were evil and their whole society was being run by a bunch zealot pigs anyway who burned "witches" who probably just knew too much about their sex lives…then the rat population goes up and they get the plague from the brown rat flea.

You know what that is you wife beater wearing morons? That's FLUFFY'S REVENGE."

DI, melanie, Now go take a valium and play with your fluffy_er..cat. : >/


mbaesq
Posted 27 December 2006 at 04:38 pm

From http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/parasite-makes-men-dumb-women-sexy/2006/12/26/1166895290973.html:

"Until recently it was thought to be an insignificant disease in healthy people, Sydney University of Technology infectious disease researcher Nicky Boulter said, but new research has revealed its mind-altering properties.

"Infected men have lower IQs, achieve a lower level of education and have shorter attention spans. They are also more likely to break rules and take risks, be more independent, more anti-social, suspicious, jealous and morose, and are deemed less attractive to women.

"On the other hand, infected women tend to be more outgoing, friendly, more promiscuous, and are considered more attractive to men compared with non-infected controls.

"In short, it can make men behave like alley cats and women behave like sex kittens".


robo
Posted 23 March 2007 at 09:43 am

"Now add in that pregnant women with high levels of Toxoplasma antibodies are more likely to have children who later develop schizophrenia,..."

I find this sentence nearly impossible to believe.

Are there subjects who have been given Toxoplasma and whose children have then been studied? If so, I can't imagine there being a large enough sample of subjects to make any correlation here between Toxoplasma and Schizophrenia, especially for a study that would take decades to carry out.

Or have schizophrenic's mothers been tested for Toxoplasma after the fact, in which case there is an assumption that Toxoplasma was present before pregnancy. Again, I find it really hard to believe that schizophrenic's mothers are sought out in large enough numbers to make any statistical sample meaningful.


advocate_of_chaos
Posted 01 April 2007 at 08:35 pm

I think it's obvious. Cats have developed a symbiotic relationship with the parasite as part of the 'Cat Master Plan' to take over the entire world. It no doubt engenders feelings of affection toward the devious creatures, thus providing the cat with a limitless source of food and lap space for resting in.

All of Egyptian history is probably just an epidemic of Toxoplasma.


kenfo
Posted 09 April 2007 at 09:12 am

avoiding this disease and curing it are remarkably similar. if your cat has Tp, chuck him out the window. if you also have the disease, follow.

this, and other such articles, lead me to believe that Canadians and midgets have at least learned these swami-mind-control tricks, or may in fact be giant parasites. They will feign anger and disbelief if they hear you talk about this subject; do not be alarmed. Make baby-noises at them and flick them on the nose, they like that. Also, tinfoil hats help the mind control bit.

Melanie is both psychotically infected, and yet right: France is the enemy. While they burned witches, they did not burn enough. Specifically, Melanie survived. She may be the first known French-Canadian-Tp infected-swami/witch. Is she short? If so, there is a black hole around here somewheres.....I'll go look.


helmett
Posted 08 May 2007 at 04:10 pm

Yes, I have suspected for sometime that my outbursts of jealousy and anger were actually caus-urrk

STATEMENT RETRACTED. HOST HAS NO OPINION OR KNOWLEDGE OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII. CARRY ON, HUMANS. NOTHING TO SEE HERE. RETURN TO YOUR CARE OF FELINE HOSTS.


Wingnut
Posted 23 December 2007 at 01:53 am

I don't have a link, but I had read that a study of NY city cab drivers said those infected had twice the accident rate due to slowed reaction time. If true, this is cause for serious concern and may be costing the world a great deal in terms of accidental death and destruction!?


abram730
Posted 16 March 2008 at 06:53 am

advocate_of_chaos said: "I think it's obvious. Cats have developed a symbiotic relationship with the parasite as part of the 'Cat Master Plan' to take over the entire world. It no doubt engenders feelings of affection toward the devious creatures, thus providing the cat with a limitless source of food and lap space for resting in.

All of Egyptian history is probably just an epidemic of Toxoplasma."

Lets not forget Jesus. Killed by Rome and then then Rome decides to wipe out all Christians.
How?
They fed them to -->lions


abram730
Posted 16 March 2008 at 06:55 am

and then what happened? The Roman empire fell and Rome became the center of Christianity... Wasn't the church centered in France too?
Doesn't that stike you as odd?

imagine you were toxoplasma gondii talking threw a man and have a plan... In a huge Mansion with many cells.

What did Jesus have to say about this?

This bread is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world....I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in him. Just as the living Father sent me and I live because of the Father, so the one who feeds on me will live because of me.

In my Father's house are many mansions..... I am in the Father, and the Father in me.... speak not of myself: but the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works...Even the Spirit of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you...

There is a plan for you... hint hint

Did you know that if you suck one protozoa up into an eyedropper they find there way out and if you suck them up again they get out faster... That's learning and search bacterial intelegence they act as one like us.

or perhaps you'd like or need a laugh after that lol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NLUSNXaJlI


abram730
Posted 16 March 2008 at 07:00 am

Stead311 said: "TV, giver of all knowledge, enlightened me to a similar occurance. There is a parasite that infects certain snails. It "tells" the snail to crawl into the open, (whereas snails usually stay where it is cold and moist) thus making them more vulnerable to birds. The parasite thrives significantly better once it is in the brain of a bird. How interesting that the smallest things in nature have a rather scary ability to command those organisms which are bigger and much more intelligent than them."

Prove humans are intellegent.


abram730
Posted 16 March 2008 at 07:49 am

robo said: ""Now add in that pregnant women with high levels of Toxoplasma antibodies are more likely to have children who later develop schizophrenia,…"

I find this sentence nearly impossible to believe.

Are there subjects who have been given Toxoplasma and whose children have then been studied? If so, I can't imagine there being a large enough sample of subjects to make any correlation here between Toxoplasma and Schizophrenia, especially for a study that would take decades to carry out.

Or have schizophrenic's mothers been tested for Toxoplasma after the fact, in which case there is an assumption that Toxoplasma was present before pregnancy. Again, I find it really hard to believe that schizophrenic's mothers are sought out in large enough numbers to make any statistical sample meaningful."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_jYqSA_fJk
Realy listen!!!
ask yourself If she is crazy!!!


cosMICK
Posted 05 June 2008 at 07:30 am

Its in the meat guys.......under cooked meet will make you crazy.....like sucking blood.....vampires new about it way back already.....toxoplazombi's.......
------------------------------------------article----------------------------------------------
When sheep, pigs, or cattle become infected, they remain infected for the rest of their lives. Undercooked pork, beef, or lamb is often infectious.
People are most likely to get toxoplasmosis from eating undercooked meat. They can also get it by accidentally getting egg spores into their mouths, either from litter boxes, the soil, infected food, or food that has become contaminated (such as unwashed fruits or vegetables).
How long does it last?
Symptoms of an acute episode of toxoplasmosis, if any, are usually gone in about 7 days. Cysts remain in the body for life. IN THE BRAIN TISSUE!
How can it be prevented?
Cooking all meat thoroughly (until it is no longer pink) is the cornerstone of prevention. All raw meats, unwashed fruits and vegetables, and the surfaces they touch should be considered contaminated. Wash hands and surfaces after any such contact and before further cooking or eating.
Prevent cats from becoming infected by not feeding them undercooked meats and by preventing them from hunting wild rodents (especially while a woman in the house is pregnant – cats shed egg-cysts in the stool for only about 2 weeks after becoming infected).
Pregnant women should avoid cat feces (as in gardening or changing litter boxes). Wearing gloves and washing thoroughly helps reduce exposure. Also, having the litter box changed daily reduces the risk, because the egg-cysts do not become infective for 2 or 3 days in the stool.
( online, http://www.drgreene.com/21_1213.html )

From a BBC documentry on parasitic organisms in society: Research in the US on toxoplasmosis infections showed that when an infected and healthy rat were placed in a maze the infected rat found its way relatively quikly to the exit with a cat pee sample and the healthy completely tried to avoid even enering. When deceased drivers of car accidents were examined it was found that 80% had toxoplasmosis antibodies in their blood. Suggesting there are possibilities of behavioural influence from the parasite, it caused the rat to happily seek out its demise so it can continue its cycle and reproduce inside a feline and but cannot develop into larvae unless its a rodent and so on, living a dorment existence in other animals & HUMANS unable to fulfill its reproductive cycle. Why? If its in its cystic dorment state would it effect its host is not completely understood but the fact that such a large percentage of the fatal car crash drivers were carriers of the parasite is alarming. And raises the question that if an infected rodent runs mindlessly straight for the red zone where a feline presence is greatest, is it possible then, that drivers of vehicles can have their judgement affected by the parasite too, making them prone to take more risks and effecting their split reactions like running red lights or stop signs even if just momentarily from just the mildest effect?...interesting considering humans should be dorment hosts for this miniscule mind controlling microbe....


DontPanic
Posted 05 June 2008 at 07:08 pm

i always thought there was something funny about cats ....

someone way in the beginning of the comments about playing in ditches making you healthier because we need the parasites or something. well it is kinda true- not sure about the parasite bit (im no expert) but i do know that kids who play in mud end up alot healthier than the no-germ-clean-freak children. I was a muddy farm kid and i now NEVER get sick and my friend who was raised with no dirt and complete cleanliness is always coming down with sicknesses. all the time. Maybe parasites to a certain degree are good for people.... ??


allduerespect88
Posted 12 December 2008 at 03:48 am

This is just plain messed up.


END OF COMMENTS
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