Comments for Damn Interesting https://www.damninteresting.com A collection of fascinating true stories from history, science, and psychology. In text and podcast form. Fri, 28 Apr 2017 22:48:36 -0600 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.4 Comment on The Reconstruction of Ulysses S. Grant by Bile Aungschott https://www.damninteresting.com/the-reconstruction-of-ulysses-s-grant/#comment-72080 Fri, 28 Apr 2017 22:48:36 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=13800#comment-72080 Great article. I had never heard that Grant and his wife were invitees that fateful evening…

Thank you!

]]>
Comment on The Reconstruction of Ulysses S. Grant by micklang https://www.damninteresting.com/the-reconstruction-of-ulysses-s-grant/#comment-72076 Thu, 27 Apr 2017 07:30:16 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=13800#comment-72076 What a great article about a man I hardly knew anything about. It’s made my day! Thanks guys! I feel terrible about the tragic points in his life, but he was very uncommon about driving forward to remedy them.

Mick Lang, London

]]>
Comment on The History of Sealand by BOB https://www.damninteresting.com/the-history-of-sealand/#comment-72075 Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:59:43 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?p=188#comment-72075 I’m very interested in Sealand, mainly because the notion of having independence from the government has many benefits such as:

-No Taxes

-You can do whatever you want (and I mean whatever)

-If you steal from another country you can make up some fake policies so that their government can’t mess with you.

]]>
Comment on Lucid Decapitation by Jeff Z https://www.damninteresting.com/lucid-decapitation/#comment-72074 Mon, 24 Apr 2017 00:52:21 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?p=495#comment-72074 If a razor sharp blade was heated, glowing red when the severance occurs, would it not cauterize the blood vessels, and reduce the drop in blood pressure. Under those conditions, this morbid inquiry might be more fruitful. How long would the heart continue to beat with a sustained blood supply? How long would the head remain conscious, under the same conditions? Could it be communicated with? The question of most concern: does it feel pain and whether the pain is physical and / or the sense of existential horror, or something else. Considering the botched executions that have visibly prolonged pain and torment using: the electric chair, gas chamber and lethal injection the guillotine is far more definitive and absolute. But weather the head lives on, and what it is it experiences, must be determined. If we can’t or won’t than end the practice of capital punishment, all together.

]]>
Comment on The Reconstruction of Ulysses S. Grant by joe https://www.damninteresting.com/the-reconstruction-of-ulysses-s-grant/#comment-72073 Wed, 19 Apr 2017 22:27:57 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=13800#comment-72073 A phrase in apposition only needs a comma…

Who let it be known, his opposition to his boss.

]]>
Comment on The Reconstruction of Ulysses S. Grant by Sean https://www.damninteresting.com/the-reconstruction-of-ulysses-s-grant/#comment-72072 Wed, 19 Apr 2017 17:28:24 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=13800#comment-72072 This article continues to present the misnomer that grant was an alcoholic. It also fails to present the conditions that led up to the one point in Grants life when he drank to much which resulted in his early retirement. Grant and his troops were being deployed to the west coast by way of panama before the canal. They were allowed to take there families but grants left his behind because his wife was pregnant and he knew the perils of the Panama crossing. A great number of his men and there families got sick with malaria during the crossing. Grant acquired a ship to serve has a hospital and helped tend his men and there families, many whom died. Struggling with little to do when finally reaching the west coast, being away from his family, the horrors of the crossing and a senior officer who was not fond of grant he turned to alcohol for one time in his life, got in trouble and was drummed out of the army. The rumor of his alcohol issue was spread by his detractors but according to his army secretary in the war, doctor and those who were with him for much of his life following the incident claim they never witnessed him over imbibe or drink in excess. It is a slander that has stuck which him but if you look deeper into the accounts of those who were close to grant for most of his life and career after the west coast stint they all claim to never have seen him abuse alcohol.
Check out “the civil war 1861-1865 a history podcast” for more detailed info and numerous sources.

]]>
Comment on Starving for Answers by James Matthews https://www.damninteresting.com/starving-for-answers/#comment-72071 Tue, 18 Apr 2017 22:06:00 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=12259#comment-72071 There are few men more courageous than COs!

]]>
Comment on The Reconstruction of Ulysses S. Grant by Wingnut https://www.damninteresting.com/the-reconstruction-of-ulysses-s-grant/#comment-72070 Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:04:12 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=13800#comment-72070 Excellent article. I love reading stuff like this. There is so much history that I missed as a teenager because I wasn’t interested. I means so much more to me now. Thanks again Michael.

]]>
Comment on The King’s Letters by James Matthews https://www.damninteresting.com/the-kings-letters/#comment-72064 Tue, 18 Apr 2017 04:03:17 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=11117#comment-72064 It’s an amazing achievement giving your nation’s language its own writing system! Another example is Sequoia’s invention of writing for the Cherokee people. (Getting your name on the world’s tallest trees is a fitting honor.)

]]>
Comment on The Reconstruction of Ulysses S. Grant by James Matthews https://www.damninteresting.com/the-reconstruction-of-ulysses-s-grant/#comment-72063 Tue, 18 Apr 2017 03:38:15 +0000 https://www.damninteresting.com/?post_type=upcoming&p=13800#comment-72063 William S. McFeely wrote an excellent 1981 biography of Grant.

As a general, Grant was so averse to retreating that whenever he returned to a previous point he’d take a different route back!

]]>