PavePusher

Lind Say said: "UGH!!!!!!!!!!!! stupid website page name!!!!!!!!!!!! I have to get facts but i have to get the website name to but this website name it to NAUGHTY so i cant use this PAGE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! STUPID NAMEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Lighten up, Lindsay.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6cxNR9ML8k

Posted 20 April 2014 at 11:59 am in response to A Potentially Disastrous Design Error

pavepusherPavePusher

andrew said: "Fascinating story.

I wonder though, how it could take three months and cost $8MM to weld steel plates over ~200 bolts. Perhaps they were in very difficult to reach places.
Well, hooray for intelligent and honest people. I also suspect Citicorp wanted to avoid the publicity that a legal proceeding would generate."

Andrew, re-read the article. It's "200+ bolted joints ", not '200 bolts'. So, 200 separate joints, each one probably several square feet with numerous bolts. This would be typical: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Construction_Workers.jpg

And yes, once the building is complete, those joints are likely under several layers of wall, cladding, wiring/piping/ducting, etc, and in confined-access spaces.

Posted 20 April 2014 at 10:22 am in response to A Potentially Disastrous Design Error

C.V.Rajan

Very interesting read and extremely lively narration studded with sarcastic humor. Other than the article I really enjoyed your comment: "The Germans fed it to their pigs; the English, following much the same line of reasoning, gave it to the Irish. " !!

C.V.Rajan

Posted 19 April 2014 at 09:44 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Matt

Can someone explain "tends to turn into a universe if left alone for a prolonged period"?

Posted 19 April 2014 at 06:17 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

David

I really think the whole thing was smoke and mirrors..to throw people off the track on what they were really doing in Waco! Dump all that money into a hole in the ground and then deside to close it down and do nothing with it? Our government and Military had other plans for it from the start. Have you tryed to go there? Did the Armed Guards let you in? Wake Up!

Posted 19 April 2014 at 03:55 pm in response to America's Discarded Superconducting Supercollider

Criggie

Where do the Russians and their distilled potato spirits come into this? Or was Russia too disconnected from Europe of the day?

Posted 19 April 2014 at 12:31 am in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Chris

So he was basically a real-life Bean from Orson Scott Card's Ender's Shadow series.

Posted 17 April 2014 at 11:10 am in response to The Man Who Was a Dwarf and a Giant

@richardlionhea

perrymichaela said: "It was launched from only 7 miles? That may seem like a lot of distance, but I wonder how high the radiation dose was that the artillery crew received. I know I would not want to be within 7 miles of a nuclear explosion."

There was ONE single person other than the aircrew of the Enola Gay that definitely saw and survived both explosions- he was farming 5 miles from the epicentre at Hiroshima when that was dropped, so decided to flee to his mothers - at Nagasaki. Three days later the train he was on was seven miles from Nagasaki when the send bonb went off.

One could feel justfied in feeling a little paranoid after that.....

Posted 17 April 2014 at 10:03 am in response to Atomic Annie and Her Nuclear Projectile

Bill

1. Ask people who believe in conspiracy theories what they think about all of this.
2. Ask the 3% of people who control the majority of wealth in the world too.
3. Finally ask computers after they have collected data for 1000 to 10,000 years because at this rate we'll be too dumb to figure it out for ourselves by then. Makes me think of the movie Idiocrasy.

Posted 16 April 2014 at 08:55 am in response to Random Event Generators Predict the Future

Bill

Sounds like looking for what you find as in Nostrodamus' predictions after the fact and how they can look so true for some people. Analyze "unknown" random events and compare them to the ones "everybody" knows and look for statistical significance.

Posted 16 April 2014 at 08:42 am in response to Random Event Generators Predict the Future

Bill

This is like predicting the future after the fact and realizing how exact the prediction was after it has already taken place as in Nostradamus and piecing together what he wrote and connecting it to real life after it has already done. Pick other "unknown" random events and see what the readings are not just the ones "everybody" is aware of and see what is found then compare those high readings with these high readings and look for statistical significance.

Posted 16 April 2014 at 08:37 am in response to Random Event Generators Predict the Future

bh90210

froggy said: "I grew up in that era and I never heard any of this before. And the eyewitness accounts of the japanese civilians Never mention leaflets. Maybe there were. I don't know as I was not in those cities at the time. But it seems strange that the eyewitnesses who survived all expressed surprise. Also, it mentions that the japanese military paid no attention to the planes, thinking they were just scouts."

Yes, Froggy, you are correct. My daughter lives in Japan and has visited Hiroshima.. Everything that we were taught as Americans in school regarding Hiroshima and that Japan was the country that 'started' it is 1000% wrong.
They were NEVER given warnings, there was NO broadcast, and there were most definitely NO pamplets dropped in Japan.

The American government only said that to try to cover up their error.

Posted 16 April 2014 at 08:33 am in response to WW2: America Warned Hiroshima and Nagasaki Citizens

Shanna

His engine was set up to take water and that water acted as a fuel. When your friend got water in the intake, then yes it will cause problems. Water and fuel will not mix, but water as the fuel is the brilliance behind the prototype.

Bucky said: "I thought that water in your pistons was B-A-D? My friend drove his truck through a huge puddle and water got in under the sparkplugs. The engine seized up so quickly that the crankshaft was bent where the pistons attach. How is this engine successful, then?

I'm still amazed he got it to work on the first try. I can hardly make a few lines of code run correctly on the first try, much less design my own revolutionary combustion engine and have it work from the start. I guess that is testament to the simplicity of the idea. It will be interesting to see where this goes in the coming years, if at all.
Maybe the car could create distilled water itself, from tapwater? That might be able to take even more heat out of the engine."

Posted 14 April 2014 at 12:55 pm in response to The Six-Stroke Engine

J. A. Macfarlane

nik said: "I thought that Friderick the great of Prussia is the one who used the trick, to make people eat potatoes.. I also found some sources saing so...
"Frederick the Great of Prussia saw the potato's potential to help feed his nation and lower the price of bread, but faced the challenge of overcoming the people's prejudice against the plant. When he issued a 1774 order for his subjects to grow potatoes as protection against famine, the town of Kolberg replied: "The things have neither smell nor taste, not even the dogs will eat them, so what use are they to us?" Trying a less direct approach to encourage his subjects to begin planting potatoes, Frederick used a bit of reverse psychology: he planted a royal field of potato plants and stationed a heavy guard to protect this field from thieves. Nearby peasants naturally assumed that anything worth guarding was worth stealing, and so snuck into the field and snatched the plants for their home gardens. Of course, this was entirely in line with Frederick's wishes." http://www.history-magazine.com/potato.html
Does anybody know which is true?"

Frederick the Great certainly encouraged the cultivation of potatoes, distributing seeds and growing instructions, which is why the Prussians had potatoes available to feed their pigs (and prisoners), but this is the first time I've heard the story attached to him (and I've done a lot of reading about potatoes recently). i suspect this is a case of misattribuation.

Posted 13 April 2014 at 04:19 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

nik

I thought that Friderick the great of Prussia is the one who used the trick, to make people eat potatoes.. I also found some sources saing so...
"Frederick the Great of Prussia saw the potato's potential to help feed his nation and lower the price of bread, but faced the challenge of overcoming the people's prejudice against the plant. When he issued a 1774 order for his subjects to grow potatoes as protection against famine, the town of Kolberg replied: "The things have neither smell nor taste, not even the dogs will eat them, so what use are they to us?" Trying a less direct approach to encourage his subjects to begin planting potatoes, Frederick used a bit of reverse psychology: he planted a royal field of potato plants and stationed a heavy guard to protect this field from thieves. Nearby peasants naturally assumed that anything worth guarding was worth stealing, and so snuck into the field and snatched the plants for their home gardens. Of course, this was entirely in line with Frederick's wishes." http://www.history-magazine.com/potato.html
Does anybody know which is true?

Posted 13 April 2014 at 02:59 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

J. A. Macfarlane

Thank you for passing that along; I must admit to my shame that I did not push my research into Lavoisier particularly far. The paper you linked to is quite convincing, though given the author's rhetorical style, I think I'd like to see a second bit of research into this before I categorically rallied to 'Didn't happen' camp -- though it's such a bon mot that odds are, alas, that it indeed did not occur.

Posted 13 April 2014 at 01:35 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Bob

This has been an interesting reading, and funny with that. But I would draw your attention to one fact, that the anecdote about the refusal of Lavoisier's request by the answer "The Republic does not need savants" is a historical forgery created by the reaction. A Swiss wrote a conference about that :

http://www.bibnumcermtri.fr/IMG/pdf/P_Chronique_Lavoisier_8_.pdf

It would be nice to re-establish the truth.

Posted 12 April 2014 at 10:28 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Andrew Shecktor

I have been to Centralia when it was a vibrant town, and only recently following it being vacated. The site of the vacant town prompted me to write a fictional novel, based on historical events and with a section on the history of the town. Much of the history has been lost to time or is very difficult to find. If anyone is interested, it is titled "Centralia PA, Devils Fire" and can be found on Amazon by searching "Centralia PA". It is a tribute to the town, and what can happen when nature gets the better of us. We feel we can control anything, but few mine fires have ever been actually put out, and thousands burn across the world.

Posted 12 April 2014 at 09:29 pm in response to The Smoldering Ruins of Centralia

patrick

Kafka said: "In Australia, Hobo's no code or language. If they can manage to get past you're front door without breaking it i.e. If you were stupid enough to leave it open, they can come in, sit on the floor, demand to be given water and food and here's the thing: Legally, YOU HAVE TO. It's a very very old law, but it's still in effect. And they won't leave until you give them something. And if you leave the house to get assistance, they'll squat in your house and NEVER leave. Those hobo bastards.

The Moral is: Never leave your door unlocked!"

!

A quick boot to the skull and they would rather quickly or get a flying lesson for free .

Posted 12 April 2014 at 09:12 pm in response to The Hobo Code

patrick

Kafka said: "In Australia, Hobo's no code or language. If they can manage to get past you're front door without breaking it i.e. If you were stupid enough to leave it open, they can come in, sit on the floor, demand to be given water and food and here's the thing: Legally, YOU HAVE TO. It's a very very old law, but it's still in effect. And they won't leave until you give them something. And if you leave the house to get assistance, they'll squat in your house and NEVER leave. Those hobo bastards.

The Moral is: Never leave your door unlocked!"

Posted 12 April 2014 at 09:09 pm in response to The Hobo Code

J. A. Macfarlane

Miguel Farah said: "What an odd article. "Parmentier invented the potato for the good of mankind", except the entire world outside France already knew about it.

Are we to understand that, after all, France (and Paris in particular) is the center of the world?"

If one listens to the French of the day (and a number of them since), certainly.

While it is true that much of the rest of Europe was aware of the potato, one must bear in mind that it was nevertheless not considered food fit for human consumption. The Germans fed it to their pigs; the English, following much the same line of reasoning, gave it to the Irish. The propensity of French noblemen and other landowners to follow the fashions of Paris -- or, more accurately, Versailles -- was instrumental in getting them to consider feeding potatoes to their own peasants. And while the famines that came about during the revolutionary wars were certainly a leading cause of the parochial but starving being willing to eat potatoes, the latter would not have been as widely available in France at the time. It is entirely likely that without potatoes, the revolution would have collapsed much sooner, through sheer attrition. As it was, France survived long enough to lose most of its (male) population in the Napoleonic wars instead.

Posted 12 April 2014 at 07:39 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Miguel Farah

What an odd article. "Parmentier invented the potato for the good of mankind", except the entire world outside France already knew about it.

Are we to understand that, after all, France (and Paris in particular) is the center of the world?

Posted 12 April 2014 at 11:42 am in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

George

"bomb the kimchi out of a North Korean chemical factory", this is damn funny.

Posted 12 April 2014 at 09:19 am in response to Pushed to the Limit

Khalid Omar

Vorador said: "i dont think its a bad thing at all...its our body, not the governments...we can get tattoos and body piercings...of course i agree that they are less drastic but, i also feel that they fall into the same category."

I agree with you - I feel we also need to problematise the ways in which such things become pathologised. (Apologies for British English spelling)

If something is difficult to understand or contradicts the ways in which so called normal people think and do - we have a need to categorise such things as a form of madness of perversion.

What if we stopped trying to interpret the things people do and attempt to actually understand it? What if we allow people true ownership of their bodies and stopped telling people how they should look, or how to adhere to current trends of beauty and so on?

I think this article is written in a really problematic way - that allows us to just bracket such people within narratives of madness - as we still consider trans people in the same way, and as we once used to consider gay people.

Posted 12 April 2014 at 06:27 am in response to Amputation Fetishism

AlphaThinker

The thing is that our brain has evolved to deal with a wild reality where uncertainty and risk are quite high and life expectancy very low. In example, having an healthy life-style is completely useless from an evolutionary point of view: no matter how much junk food you will eat, you will be likely to survive until the age of 40 at least, giving you the possibility of procreating. Basically our brain is tuned for an high-risk environment, so it can behave irrationally in a low-risk environment.

Posted 12 April 2014 at 03:58 am in response to Hyperbolic Discounting

J. A. Macfarlane

Hmm. You may have been misinformed. 'Pomme de terre' translates much more rigourously as 'earth apple' rather than as 'apple from the earth', which would (pedantically) be 'pomme de la terre'. But I don't disagree about the rather more salivatory nature of 'apple from the earth'.

One of my dictionaries tells me that the best translation for 'patate' is 'spud', so you may be on to something with the distinction between the two.

Of course, one reason people didn't like potatoes at first is that it took them a while to work out that peeling and cooking them was an ideal. Certain nutritionists have restored the value of the peel (and others war against them), but certainly, taking the 'apple' part of the term to heart and eating potatoes as one does the fruit was eventually worked out to not be the best of ideas.

Posted 11 April 2014 at 07:15 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

HiEv

When I learned French back in college, we were taught that "pomme de terre" ("apple from the earth") was the French for "potato". A quick search suggests that "patate" refers to the root and "pomme de terre" refers to the whole plant, but I'm no expert on French so I could be a bit off there.

Still, "apple from the earth" sounds much more appetizing. :-)

Posted 11 April 2014 at 07:02 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Ard Ri

POTATO EATERS!!!

Posted 11 April 2014 at 06:51 am in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

greg

Thanks for a great article, and that response is DI as well. Its funny how much we take for granted today, I can't imagine being denied what I think of as staples like potatoes, tomatoes and such simply because of ignorance and a fear of new things.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 06:09 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

JMW

Awesome article!

Posted 10 April 2014 at 05:11 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

J. A. Macfarlane

P. S.: As to your question regarding the Catholic Church's official stance, I very much doubt it had a great deal to say about potatoes. Several popes demonstrated an interest in potatoes as early as the 16th century, when Philip II of Spain first sent some to the Vatican. (See Ferrières, Toussaint-Samat, and Kiple.) But one must remember that the Gallican Church jealously guarded its privileges vis à vis Rome and had a strong independent streak to it. France was noticeably resistant to the potato, far more so than other countries. And of course, there was also resistance due to the fact that potatoes were fodder for beasts: if the Prussians fed Parmentier potatoes, it's because slops for the pigs were good enough for the prisoners. There was a long tradition of differentiating humans from the other animals by insisting that humans not eat like beasts, which included not eating the food reserved for animals except in time of direst famine -- and even then some people resisted eating potatoes. (See especially Ferrières.)

Certainly, Scottish Presbyterians noted the potato's absence from the Bible.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 04:43 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

J. A. Macfarlane

Alice G. said: "Would you please post your source for this claim:

"The Church, which collected a tax on all agricultural production and therefore profited but scantly from anything as cheap as the potato, pointed out that this strange root from America was not mentioned in the Bible, and must therefore be dangerous and evil—possibly even the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Apparently the serpent tempted Eve with a plate of fries."
Also, when you say "The Church," do you mean to say that this teaching on potatoes was an official stance of the Catholic Church? Who specifically said this?"

Other than the various sources already present under ‘further reading’, for resistance to the potato on biblical grounds, see (1), (2) and (3). Voltaire commenting on Parmentier’s efforts through the publication of pamphlets, pointed out that the peasants couldn’t read; their main source of information was the village cure, who in the provinces was quiet likely to be almost as ill-educated as they.

The history of the search for identifying the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil is a fascinating one in its own right. Many options have been proposed. The apple, of course, is the most common; this seems to derive from a false Latin etymology, either a confusion between or a pun on ‘mali’, as ‘Evil’ is noted in the Latin, and ‘malum’, apple. In fact, the apple’s identification as the fruit Eve ate is a latecomer; it has been suggested that it came about during the Christianisation of Celtic Europe, whose paradise was Avalon, the Isle of Apples. Desiring to root this out, apples had to become identified with evil. It’s one theory. (4)

Another very popular candidate is the fig, based on the fact that Adam and Eve reported covered themselves with fig leaves when they realised they were naked. (5) However, as Toussaint-Samat points out on the next page, scientifically this is untenable, as the fig is not actually a fruit (6). Further candidates were the apricot and the orange (7).

Plants that came from the New World were, however, happily assimilated with the fruit. Partly this may be due to the conviction that the New World presented ‘virgin ground’, an ‘unspoiled view of nature’ -- not to mention the idea that the Natives of North America might be descendants of the ten lost tribes of Israel (8). Among these was the tomato, which due to its relationship with various poisonous plants was regarded suspiciously well into the 19th century. The tomato has the advantage of actually being a fruit, though as has been said, the wisdom acquired on eating it is not to put it in a fruit salad. Just as the potato is known as the ‘earth apple’ in France, the tomato was first introduced as the ‘love apple’ – derived from the Italian pomodamor. In fact, the Italian originally meant ‘Moor’s apple’, as the tomato was believed to have been introduced by the Moors, but the euphony with the word ‘amor’, love, was too good to resist. This was enhanced by belief in the aphrodisiacal nature of the tomato, something that was also ascribed to the potato. (9) (10)

Gaspard Bauhin, who gave the potato its scientific name, noted this supposed faculty, doubtless another reason why the potato was considered a candidate for being a source of evil. He also noted its propensity for causing flatulence, which was recognised throughout the centuries, though around the time that Parmentier was working, the upper classes, prepared to propagate the potato as peasant food, simply noted ‘What’s an extra bit of wind to a peasant?’ (11)

One will, of course, note the sexual connotations of many of these proposed candidates, with the tomato and potato being considered aphrodisiac, and the long-standing association of the fig with the testicles and the apricot with the female genitalia. Perhaps this is why the French, wishing to keep up their reputation as lovers, eventually adopted both tomato and potato. Today, they grow more tomatoes than any other foodstuff, exceeding even the potato. (12)

(1) http://www.cambridge.org/us/books/kiple/potatoes.htm
(2) Harvey Benham, Man’s Struggle for Foodp. 297
(3) Kenneth Kiple, A Movable Feast: Ten Millennia of Food Globalization, p. 139
(4) http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/words-eat/201109/forbidden-fruit
(5) Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, A History of Food, p. 671.
(6) Ibid., p. 672
(7) Ibid., p. 671
(8) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Lost_Tribes
(9) Kenneth Kiple, A Movable Feast: Ten Millennia of Food Globalization, p.141
(10) Janet Long, “Tomatoes”, in The Cambridge World History of Food, I: 354-358
(11) Madeleine Ferrières, Sacred Cow, Mad Cow: A History of Food Fears
(12) Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, A History of Food, p. 709.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 04:07 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

JMW

That awkward moment you realize that the FB page is well and alive...well DI just got a new fan then! :)

Posted 10 April 2014 at 03:28 pm in response to The Unfortunate Sex Life of the Banana

JMW

Here from a link on mental_floss's article on (of course) bananas. I just went through a few pages of comments, and I am amazed at the outpouring of heartfelt messages to Mr. Alan Bellows. Also somewhat dismayed that I missed the, well, heyday of this place. Hoping there's a renaissance and that all is well with the Bellows...Brothers? Bellows and Sons? Newbie moment here...
(Off-topic: at least the site is still up and running, despite the lack of updates, and people occasionally comment. Anyone here used to play Island Paradise? Farming game on FB, and when Meteor Games went under...well let's just say I miss those forums :/ No comparison at ALL, of course, but that's my only experience with online things that have fallen away.)
Have a good day one and all! :)

Posted 10 April 2014 at 03:25 pm in response to The Unfortunate Sex Life of the Banana

Ben

If MWI is correct, is there a universe were every possibility DID happen at once, in the one universe... I'd love to go and study this, but i don't know if my brain could handle it lol.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 02:52 pm in response to Quantum Mechanics and Immortality

Col

Sophie said: "Parmentier is not remembered in the name of the potato, but a delicious gratin dish is named “hachis parmentier”. It’s a layer of seasoned minced meat (often leftovers) covered with a layer of mashed potatoes, a little bit of grated cheese, and put to grill in an oven."

This sounds delicious, positively making me drool!

Posted 10 April 2014 at 02:17 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Col

Very interesting, a darned good read and to make spuds a topic of interest is a little bit of genius in itself.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 02:13 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Sophie

Parmentier is not remembered in the name of the potato, but a delicious gratin dish is named “hachis parmentier”. It’s a layer of seasoned minced meat (often leftovers) covered with a layer of mashed potatoes, a little bit of grated cheese, and put to grill in an oven.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 01:56 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Yann C.

On your final note, it seems you're forgetting the french variation of cottage pie, which is called "hachis parmentier". It makes regular appearances in school dining halls, is an easy comfort food and you could even find some gourmet duck-based cans of it in french military rations.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 01:10 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Ben

FOURTH

Posted 10 April 2014 at 01:07 pm in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Woody Brison

At one point, pigs were introduced on the island. They ate the crabs and did quite well. With the crabs not eating every green growing thing on the island as soon as it should poke up its little cotyledon, the vegetation started to do pretty well too. The island was turning into a tropical forest like many of them. Then some environmentalists got incensed because this is interfering with the natural course of the ecosystem. They shot all the pigs. The crabs came back and took over. So the island has returned to its "natural" ie. out of balance state, as if pigs, vegetation, and any other species that can migrate to the island, including man weselves and any other thing that might ride with us, are not part of nature.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 12:57 pm in response to The Tyrant of Clipperton Island

Niall Flynn

For the record the occupying English killed all those ppl during the spud famine, by forcing them to export all the other crops, that said excellent as always :)

Posted 10 April 2014 at 11:36 am in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Alice G.

Would you please post your source for this claim:

"The Church, which collected a tax on all agricultural production and therefore profited but scantly from anything as cheap as the potato, pointed out that this strange root from America was not mentioned in the Bible, and must therefore be dangerous and evil—possibly even the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Apparently the serpent tempted Eve with a plate of fries."

Also, when you say "The Church," do you mean to say that this teaching on potatoes was an official stance of the Catholic Church? Who specifically said this?

Posted 10 April 2014 at 09:53 am in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

Brandon

Very....damn interesting! Love the articles you guys post.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 09:49 am in response to Cry Havoc, and Let Slip the Spuds of War

James Love

I noticed that there were a few comments who blamed Armstrong's fate on capitalism. But he got screwed twice and both times were by the government.

In the first case the Supreme Court shot down his patent despite the fact that he was first for 2 years. That is all government.

As for the 1945 ruling changing the frequencies...yes RCA was clearly the culprit there. But they used their lobbying influence (and God knows how much in the way of political campaigns) to influence the GOVERNMENT to suddenly change the dial. The government was the one who actually made the decision.
That was not the fault of capitalism. That was the government being influenced by crony capitalism.

Posted 10 April 2014 at 01:50 am in response to The Tragic Birth of FM Radio

justdave

" ...and they had a laughably small sample size of Jesuses" almost made sandwich come out my nose!

Thanks Alan for another D.I. article, and thanks Andy for sharing your story.

Posted 07 April 2014 at 12:36 pm in response to Three Thrown Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Arlean Kelley

This is so interesting. Spencer, (1) how long did it take you to learn Portuguese. As a Florida-born and raised American very interested in the Confederados and have been for years. (2) Do you know what time of year the convention is held? And question (3), how safe is the area for a retirement age woman alone?

I could be tempted to go there myself and stay for six months.

anakin876 said: "Actually - the nearby cities of Piracicaba and Santa Barbara D'Oeste share a similar accent with Americana. When I was there learning Portuguese a woman in Piracicaba told me after one month that I no longer had an american accent. I still did have an accent - I just had the same one as her. The influence of the Confederados still lingers on."

I am an American who lived in Americana for 6 months and while I was their, I was invited to teach English and be a guest speaker at a couple of English schools. Wierd how some of those peoples grand parents had been fluent in English and now they are all trying to learn it again. FYI, being able to speak English in Brazil is like a status symbol. I talked to hundreds of Brazilians while I was their and I never met anybody that told me that they were a descendent of the "Americanos," although I heard about the Americanos alot. It's one of the richest cities in Brazil and the poeple their are awesome.
The people from Americana sound like normal brazilians but the people from Piracicaba talk weird. The first time I heard someone from Piracicaba speak I thought to myself "I'm pretty sure that guy is Brazilian, but he sure did sound like an American speaking Portuguese with a bad accent and a southern drawl." Gees, what I wouldn't do for some Calda de Cana and Coracao de Frango right now (translation - Sugar Cane juice and Chicken hearts). P.S. If you haven't been to Brazil, put it on your to do list. That place is awesome!!

Posted 07 April 2014 at 12:11 am in response to The Confederados

Innocent

by far the strangest thing I have ever read...awesome!!!!!

Posted 06 April 2014 at 11:55 pm in response to The Supernatural Bunnymother of Surrey

Silverhill

The pale blue oxygen froze instantly into a pale blue solid. This proved that the twenty cubic centimeters of liquid in the collector was indeed hydrogen.

This is an odd method of demonstration, considering that since the input gas was pure hydrogen, the liquid had to be hydrogen.
Since there was apparently already a thermometer that showed the temperature, I suppose that Dewar wanted to dramatically (of course) show that the temperature of this liquid was definitely below the lowest known freezing point.

Posted 06 April 2014 at 08:41 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Minele Sonu

THE CANOVA MEDALLION

The Canova Medallion is a large coin (not a pendant) that was utilized by the notorious Indian thug Behram to commit murder by strangulation between 1820 and 1840. In 1840, Behram was arrested and tried in a small courthouse in Jabalpur by the English Magistrate Col. Henry Sleeman. In 1920, some 80 years after his execution, a story about the notorious thug was published in a newspaper called Taj, an Urdu daily published from Jabalpur, whose editor at that time was a young man named Abul Ala Maududi. An artist’s impression (sketch) of the Canova medallion appeared in the newspaper with the caption in Urdu- “A coin seized from thug Behram, as drawn by a writer of the Kutcheri”. In the absence of photography in those days (1830s), the writer or artist at the Kutcheri (court) had faithfully sketched and recorded the item in fine detail, with the likeness of the great Italian artist Antonio Canova on one side and an image of his famous “Three Graces” on the other. There was no mention as to how Behram came in possession of such a medallion. But it was also reported to weigh 90 grams and had a diameter of about 2.3 inches. It was part of the items sized from Behram and was an important exhibit during his trial, its sinister purpose having been corroborated by his fellow thugs who were captured by Sleeman. Behram kept the medallion sewn in his silken cummerbund which he would skilfully use to throw around a victim’s neck. The weight of the metal together with his practiced dexterity made sure that the medallion landed on the victim’s adam’s apple enabling Behram to perform a quick and effective strangulation.
A few months after the publication of the article by the Taj, the young Abul Ala Maududi was visited by a family who claimed to be descendents of the late Thug. They explained that they were residents of Nizamabad (a town in the Nizam’s territories or present day Andhra Pradesh) and had travelled to Jabalpur to sell various personal effects of the late Behram if Abul Ala Maududi were to find buyers for them. What the other items were is not known but Maududi, a staunch Muslim, did not want to have anything to do with the infamous medallion. It remained with the thug’s family till recent times before it was acquired by a numismatist from Bangalore for his private collection.
A piece of interesting history passed down by the descendants of thug Behram is however noteworthy. The story goes that Behram was a Persian by descent claiming lineage to some worthy soldier of the invading Nadir Shah’s army who had settled in the north Indian kingdom of Awadh. Behram was married and even as he was incarcerated at Jabalpur the British had managed to arrest and bring to Jabalpur the eldest son of the thug, a teenager named Ali all the way from Awadh. This was intended to put pressure on Behram to reveal the location of all the booty he had collected over the years. On seeing his son also becoming an innocent scapegoat in the hands of the English officials of the East India company, Behram decided to turn Approver in the hope that both of them would receive better treatment in the hands of the law. His ploy worked to the extent that the innocent Ali could not be ill-treated by the officials any longer. And Behram admitted to involvement in 931 killings.
As the Magistrate would not allow free movement to Behram, Ali was required to take instructions from Behram and lead the English officials to the various ravines, woods and sites where the hoards of booty was buried. On a couple of occassions the treasures buried by Behram were traced. The story goes that these seizures never arrived at Jabalpur as evidence or court exhibits. They were pocketed by the East India Company officials. Following Behram’s execution in 1840, Ali continued to be in a state of detention as the Company officials were certain the notorious thug may have revealed to his son the location of more booty. Ali was taken to Vellore cantonment and in an act of dubious kindness allowed to run an Indigo factory in the sepoy lines. For some years he was constantly harangued by East India Company officials to reveal the location of Behram’s treasures. But in spite of the abnormal presence of an Indigo factory run by a civilian Muslim in the midst of a British cantonment, the factory was never removed or relocated. Even if a new Company official unfamiliar with Ali’s history tried to do so, instructions in writing would immediately arrive from the influential and greedy coterie of bounty hunting officials of the East India Company justifying the continuance of the Indigo factory in their cantonment. There was no way that they were setting Ali free until he revealed all that he knew. In fact one such document (Correspondence from the Quarter Master General’s office regarding the Indigo Factory in the Sepoy Lines at Vellore) somehow came into Ali’s possession and remains in existence even today along with the infamous Canova medallion. At some point in time, Ali is believed to have escaped from the Vellore cantonment to the Nizam’s kingdom of Hyderabad and later reunited with his mother at Awadh in north India. Conditions being unsafe at Awadh he brought his mother as well as the rest of Behram’s family members to Nizamabad in Hyderabad state where their descendants live incognito up to today.

Posted 06 April 2014 at 01:27 pm in response to The Thugs of India

Sharath

This is one cool read. One of the most interesting 15 mins that I have spent. Keep it coming guys.

Posted 06 April 2014 at 05:37 am in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Mr Alpha Omega.

Dear sir/madam.

There is another matter/element that might be interesting when condensed to a gas, liquid, and ultimately solid form and that's the Neutron. I admit I'm a layman when it comes to the subject of nuclear physics but once humans learn how to contain them in large volumes i would have thought an element with no electrons or protons at all would do a few interesting things. I mean in theory you could stick it in the middle and on the outside of an atomic warhead core for example and use it as a hyper initiator. Press the fire button attached to the explosive lenses and drop the containment field at the same time: Result flood of neutrons heading inwards and outwards, more Plutonium atoms being split as the warhead expands. Or do something more sensible like use them to boost the reaction inside a Tritium-Lithium 5/Lithium 6 Fission Fusion reactor. Admittedly a shell made of atomic waste would probably supply enough Neutrons to feed the reaction but.. Anyway. Thanks for reading. Hope the links OK. Hope i haven't gone of subject too much.
Yours sincerely.
Mr Alpha Omega. AKA Andy.

http://periodictableofelements.wikia.com/wiki/Neutronium
Ps. Brilliant article. Well done yet again.

Posted 04 April 2014 at 06:52 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Ashley Schwenkel

It probably has a lot to do with the cerebral cortex. The part of the brain that controls all bodily functions, movements, responses and reactions. As well as with the conscious and unconscious mind. Frequency rates of meditation and of thoughts probably also have a lot to do with this, as well. Very interesting, but it seems as if there are definitely more than one explanation to this disorder or symptom. With all of the different categories of the brain, and how they react and connect to all other bodily functions, anything can be detected, and found back to its roots. The root of the problem or issue, that is. This is what is so amazing to the human body. And just life in general, itself.

Ashley Schwenkel
22 year old female

Posted 04 April 2014 at 02:48 pm in response to The Seventh Sense

georgia thomas

decoding message with base subtraction. will bet back with you soon;
)

Posted 03 April 2014 at 11:45 pm in response to The "Wow!" Signal

morey234

Charles Bagwell said: "David Hahn USN/USMC (ret.(/T.T.I. said: "Do not believe everything you hear. Most is untrue or "here-say". Thumper2356 , I would like to converse science with ya. Just contact me at Uranight12@yahoo.com and /or search for my facebook page. Yes, this is the real D. Hahn. Currently, I am searching for a few old friends (Navy) James Wagner II, Hector Perez and Fredrick Santos. I have documented/recorded massive amounts of "potential" reactor designs. Most problems appear to be shortages of thermalized neutrons and/or neutron poisons. There may be a way to utilize a rotational device to physically/chemically separate Lead (Pb204) from Pb206, Pb207 and Pb208. There are only 2 neutron multipliers known Beryllium 9/4 and Lead204. Could Lead be used as a fuel??? Well, "possibly" but there are a great number of problems. First, Lead (even increasing the Pb204 content to 5%) would have to mixed with Bismuth for a compound that is slightly more Bismuth (by weight) than Lead. Bismuth has to be added because it is one of the few ways to increase the chance than neutrons will be absorbed by the Lead (5-7% respectively). Problem is that all that Bismuth would eventually react to yield a specific % of polonium 210, once a Bismuth atom(s) accepts a neutron. Polonium210 may be a neutron poison.
Natural Lead contains Lead (Pb204) content of 1.4%. Interesting enough, when mixed with Bismuth (proportionally) the average Pb/204 content is the same as U235 in Natural Uranium (which as 0.70%). For these reasons, Natural Lead or Lead with a higher Pb204 content may be used to support additional neutrons for reactor "start up" procedures. Some say Californium would be a better choice since it spontaneously emits neutrons. When it comes down to it. The real problem is that there is "way to much" Thorium 232 available to the nuclear industry. Unfortunatly, steps have not been made to process or store Uranium233. Uranium233 is a great power source for Satellites and other related devices. There are thousands of ways to produce a safe "breeder reactor". There are millions of compounds that (when placed in the correct configuration) will not allow the breeding Thorium232 to exceed a given amount of Uranium233. If anyone explains to you that "breeder reactors are too dangerous or unsafe, "DOES NOT' have the skills and/or knowledge to design 3-dimensional control (elements/compounds) for excess (or above excess) neutrons produced. The Earth currently has only 0.70% of Uranium235 available in any Uranium deposit. That number will slowly decline. In the future, many scientists will "look back" and potentially say "why diden't we use the Uranium235 when we had it to help produce Uranium233 from all the Thorium deposits, reserves and mines? Some one will find a way to produce a relatatively safe breeder reactor utilizing , U235, Thorium232 and other materials,compounds or elements. In the near future, I am sure that man will create massive rocket ships. Ships similar to the "star trek episodes on TV". These ships will have to be powered by some fuel source. Power is extremely serious in space, especially when there is a shortage. Back up systems should
have U233 generators, in mind. For the Future transportation of people towards universal expansion."

Hello,
I would like to contact the real "Boy scout" to discuss my plans on building a small, 10-20KW/h thermal, Thorium reactor to heat my home/shop and supply enough power to go off-grid. If you are interested in starting a dialogue on the subject, please contact me at mrcdb@charter.net or see my web site at http://www.zerwellenergy.com, which is dedicated to promoting Thorium Energy.
Thanks, Charles Bagwell, Erie, MI."

No you don't want to contact him he is mentally troubled.

Posted 03 April 2014 at 04:54 pm in response to Smoke Detectors and a Radioactive Boyscout

rachel

Bolens said: "Do pilgrims taste like chicken?"

lol :D hhahahahahahaha nice

Posted 03 April 2014 at 01:49 am in response to Extinction of the Passenger Pigeons

rachel

redinc07 said: "1c3d0g said: "You know, when I read stories like this, it really makes me ashamed to be part of this so-called Human race. The arrogance of humanity never ceases to amaze me. Poor harmless animals being clubbed to death, their eyes sewn shut? What the hell?!? Disgusting! I truly believe some people have shit for brains…they should be taken out back and shot! >:|"

Pretty hypocritical to say of you, and i dont even know you. I'm sure you've stepped on a bug, squashed some ants, or swatted some flies. You're probably not even a vegetarian! :)"

that's very true, but shes obviously trying to stand up for these diffenceless birds. (sorry for my bad spelling im only 12)

Posted 03 April 2014 at 01:43 am in response to Extinction of the Passenger Pigeons

15 year old eager to learn

Grateful said: "My grandfather is a WWII veteran who flew in the Air Force. One day a Japanese woman approached him in a parking lot. She had noticed his veteran's plates and assumed by his age that he had fought in WWII. She asked him if he had flown in the missions that had burned her city. He said he had and became uncomfortable not knowing the intent of her wanting to speak with him. Before continuing, she hugged him and expressed that she wanted to thank him. She said that she was young during this time and when the flyers were distributed, the Japanese military prevented the civilians from evacuating the city. She was fortunate to have found a way to escape. She thanked him again and told him she knew that nothing less than what America had done would have stopped the Japanese government. When I was young, a Japanese lady who went to my church also recounted stories of these flyers that she had been told by her parents and grandparents."

wow that story is amazing thank you for sharing

Posted 02 April 2014 at 03:58 pm in response to WW2: America Warned Hiroshima and Nagasaki Citizens

Alan Bellows

Ben said: "...I was in the shower last night and the brilliancy of the title finally hit me. I read it as 'ok', but then I realised... absolute zero is literally '0k'."

Are you familiar with http://www.reddit.com/r/Showerthoughts/ ?

Danielle said: "I am using this article as a close read for a teacher training because its just wonderful and the vocabulary choice by the author is fabulous"

This is a high compliment...thank you.

Posted 02 April 2014 at 03:33 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Danielle

Ben said: "I read this about 4 days ago, and I was in the shower last night and the brilliancy of the title finally hit me. I read it as 'ok', but then I realised... absolute zero is literally '0k'. Amazing... just amazing :D"

Thanks for this side note. I am and English teacher and I am using this article as a close read for a teacher training because its just wonderful and the vocabulary choice by the author is fabulous...anyways, I was unsure of what OK meant and I figured it was associated with absolute zero somehow...yep, it is. Appreciate the side bar. Now I will appear more scientific while I give my presentation.

Posted 02 April 2014 at 02:51 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

lesley teitelbaum

MM said: "I spent five years with this condition, and it is worse than hell. At the same time, it is NOT hell, because you really don't care. Yeah, that might sound laughable, but when you get right down to it, wouldn't most people agree that not caring - at all! - is worse than the deepest sadness or hatred? Well, now I have absolutetly no doubt about that whatsoever - and that is an emotional reaction! :-) With this condition - and neither do I have any doubt about its existence - you don't live, you just exist. You don't feel, you just function. It's like being in a coma in the sense that, the second you snap out of it, you can no longer imagine what it was like being in it. It's totally impossible for living, feeling people - myself included - to imagine this kind of existence. I just know it was awful. I snapped out of it one night while sitting around playing a boring computer game (Minesweeper), instead of celebrating Christmas.

P.S. If there are any others out there who want to know how I recovered, feel free to ask, but it won't help you much."

I am interested to know how you recovered - thank you !

Posted 02 April 2014 at 09:39 am in response to The Emotional Bankruptcy of Alexithymia

Alan Bellows

Mr Science said: "All other internet references are to this article, so good job in coining the phrase."

I cannot take coining credit, but sadly I no longer have the links to the older references. The oldest I found at the time of writing the article (2006) was a discussion thread on the St. Paul Pioneer Press from the mid 1990s where participants were discussing the sensation, and decrying the lack of a term for it. Someone there asserted naming rights and called it "Baader-Meinhof," presumably based on their own experience hearing that moniker twice in close temporal proximity.

The more scientifically accepted name nowadays is "frequency illusion," but Stanford linguistics professor Arnold Zwicky didn't coin that term until 2006, over a decade after Baader-Meinhof was coined, and around the same time this article was written. So I argue that both names are valid given the history.

Posted 02 April 2014 at 07:53 am in response to The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon

Mr Science

"How the phenomenon came to be known as "Baader-Meinhof" ... " my question is to whom is this known to? There is no mention of this syndrome in any published scientific, medical, or psychological literature. It does not appear in the list of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)

Therefore my conclusion is that only the author, Mr. Bellows, knows the phenomenon by that name. All other internet references are to this article, so good job in coining the phrase.

Posted 02 April 2014 at 06:42 am in response to The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon

Ern

Awesome one! great read, thanks :)

Posted 02 April 2014 at 05:20 am in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

wunc

great article, really interesting.
I vaguely remember a school teacher telling me about it years ago, but thanks for reminding me of the full story.

Posted 01 April 2014 at 09:13 pm in response to It Came from Beneath the Sea

Jrunner2112

Damn Interesting as is with all the stories. This article among others finally got me off my F* magnet to register and contribute. Welcome back and keep up the great work.

Posted 01 April 2014 at 12:20 pm in response to Better Call Sol

GDSquire

GDSquire said: "Kerrany said: "That may be the coolest Damned Interesting I've ever read, pun intended. XD"

I would hope it's not Damned"

Posted 31 March 2014 at 08:45 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

GDSquire

Kerrany said: "That may be the coolest Damned Interesting I've ever read, pun intended. XD"

I would hope it's not Damned

Posted 31 March 2014 at 08:44 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

GDSquire

Alan, thank god a new article. I was suffocating! I learned something new, Helium turns into 1 atom? Amazing.

If you're looking for a new article idea, check out the FBI Vault, or "The Vault" and have a look-see at Amelia Earhart. 2 men and their stories.

Posted 31 March 2014 at 08:38 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

James

Here is an awesome NOVA that covers all of this stuff and the modern efforts to create a Bose-Einstein condensate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1wBWtUG2uY

Posted 30 March 2014 at 08:59 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Kyle Jones

I believe it could be a Leviathan Melvilli which went extinct around 12 million years ago along with the megalodon it was a top predator It had no known predators some say the megalodon feared it some say they were allies but whatever the case is. I believe it is an even more giant Levithan Melvilli than its recorded maximum length of (50-70ft long) I believe it's one thats 2 or 3 times that length the waters of the bloop sound were over 7000ft deep which is home to giant squid and whales. Since no recorded sharks have been known to adapt to the cold depths of the Antarctic, so you can count the magalodon out. Levi, fed on other whales and even squid I believe it stunted its growth and feeds on giant squid and whales down in the cold depths of the arctic.

Posted 30 March 2014 at 06:06 pm in response to The Call of the Bloop

Matthew Cardello

"That wasn't flying, it was falling with style." - Woody

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwN6efmhp7E

Posted 30 March 2014 at 04:34 pm in response to The Gimli Glider

Grateful

My grandfather is a WWII veteran who flew in the Air Force. One day a Japanese woman approached him in a parking lot. She had noticed his veteran's plates and assumed by his age that he had fought in WWII. She asked him if he had flown in the missions that had burned her city. He said he had and became uncomfortable not knowing the intent of her wanting to speak with him. Before continuing, she hugged him and expressed that she wanted to thank him. She said that she was young during this time and when the flyers were distributed, the Japanese military prevented the civilians from evacuating the city. She was fortunate to have found a way to escape. She thanked him again and told him she knew that nothing less than what America had done would have stopped the Japanese government. When I was young, a Japanese lady who went to my church also recounted stories of these flyers that she had been told by her parents and grandparents.

Posted 30 March 2014 at 01:55 pm in response to WW2: America Warned Hiroshima and Nagasaki Citizens

JoTuN

Excelent article,most definatly D.I. looking forward to the next item.keep up the good work ;)

Posted 28 March 2014 at 06:57 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Beckett Nodal

Hershey... meet Centralia. Now let's make some freakin' s'mores.

Posted 27 March 2014 at 11:11 pm in response to The Smoldering Ruins of Centralia

braintumor

I suppose the Indian rationale for supporting the cult was that their actions generally made it easier for surviving males to acquire mates. It's incredibly cold, but I can see that if there's a cult of people going around killing men, and you're a man who survives it, you can't help but think it's a stroke of luck that there's suddenly all these available women standing around crying."

Actually, in ancient India, widows were considered bad luck and were not allowed to remarry. They were either forced to join the husband in his cremation (Sati pratha, was eliminated by Ram Mohan Roy) or had to live in isolation from society with other widows in some holy city. (Watch "Water" by Deepa Mehta). In short, women in India don't become available when their partner dies, even today, in less advanced areas.

Which is very sad actually.

Posted 27 March 2014 at 07:41 pm in response to The Thugs of India

Neale Pickett

Damn prescient, Jason.

7 years later, a hospital is about to begin attempting almost the very technique you suggest at the end: replacing the patient's blood—all of it—with cooled saline, to give surgeons enough time to repair otherwise lethal structural damage.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22129623.000-gunshot-victims-to-be-suspended-between-life-and-death.html

Posted 27 March 2014 at 12:03 pm in response to Beware the Dangers of Oxygen

Bob

I love damn interesting keep the articles comming
!

Posted 26 March 2014 at 08:56 pm in response to Aches on a Plane

Mayan

Greetings from India. I typed "something to read" in google and reached DI. I'm so glad I found you.

The articles are not just informative but very entertaining too. Keep up the good work!

Mayan

Posted 26 March 2014 at 04:23 am in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Bella

Shaun Wilkinson said: "Nobody else get freaked out by the sudden appearance of a picture of the guy from this story suddenly appearing and taking over the entire window for a second?"

Yeah, I almost made a Masterpiece.

Posted 26 March 2014 at 12:37 am in response to Remember, Remember the 22nd of November

Shikha GUpta

Nooo - Ganesha's father is Shiva - one of the holy trinity and one who is above the cycle of life and birth. Yes, Shive did behead Ganesh by mistake (not immediately after birth though) and then replaced the head with that of an elephant.

tednugentkicksass said: "Radiatidon said: "Yes Nicki there is. The Elephant headed Ganesha is the Indian god of wisdom, and patron of travelers and merchants. He helps people to overcome obstacles. People will pray to Ganesha when they look to undertake any business or significant and risky event."

Didn't Ganesh kill his own father? My knowledge of the Hindu mythology is by no means complete, or even deep, but I thought Ganesha was beheaded by his father after birth, and consequently got the elephant's head and killed his pops. (Please correct my ignorance if I'm wrong)
On a more related thread of thought: why the hell have I never heard of this before? The thuggies have got to be the coolest/creepiest secret society ever! I've heard of the silken stranglings, but never an actual reference to this cult. DI, you've done it again.
daffyduck said: "There are Kali-worshipping cults that still exist today, mainly in Northern India, but who travels on horseback & in bullock carts these days."
My bullocks require their own cart. Sorry, I couldn't resist."

Posted 25 March 2014 at 03:27 am in response to The Thugs of India

bookworm.cp8

Great article! Glad to see ya'll back at it once more.

Posted 24 March 2014 at 04:59 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

John Peterson

This was a well written, interesting account of the attack. There is much more background on the attacker, Auburn Calloway that never made it into the news.

I'm a former Navy pilot, now retired airline captain and I flew with pilots who knew Calloway prior to his employment with FedEx. This is what they told me.

Calloway was a sub-standard pilot. His first response to any criticism was to cry "racism." It got to the point that during Naval pilot training, no instructor was allowed to give him below average ratings despite his poor performance. He just got extra time and was "trained to proficiency." This does not happen, normally. I know. I was a Navy instructor pilot. Once he was deployed to his fleet squadron, Calloway was so poor a performer that he was never advanced to aircraft commander, relegated to being only a co-polot.

Calloway exited the Navy and was hired by Flying Tigers, another historic cargo company that subsequently was bought out by Federal Express. Calloway did not make it through his probationary year at Tigers. He was fired. He then went to Federal Express and lied on his application, omitting that he had been hired and fired by Flying Tigers. Some of the FedEx pilots who were former Tigers pilots recognized Calloway and reported him to management. Whether Calloway was going to be terminated for employment fraud or just poor performance is not known. What is known is that he was a low skilled pilot with an over-inflated image of himself and a hair trigger for claiming racism whenever any deficiency was pointed out.

Posted 24 March 2014 at 07:18 am in response to Aches on a Plane

Branwen Frost

There was an episode of "The Scarifyers" that combined the truth of the acoustic mirrors with the Lovecraft cannon. It was episode 2 entitled "The Devil Of Denge Marsh". As I write this I have just discovered two more episode that I haven't heard before. I thought they would have stopped because Nicolas Courtney (the voice of one of the main characters and the actor who played Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart in Doctor Who) died.

Posted 23 March 2014 at 11:22 pm in response to WW2: Britain's Giant Concrete Ears

Kim Easton

I think this is perhaps the best Damn Interesting article that I have read. Thanks Alan.

Posted 23 March 2014 at 05:05 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Ben

I read this about 4 days ago, and I was in the shower last night and the brilliancy of the title finally hit me. I read it as 'ok', but then I realised... absolute zero is literally '0k'. Amazing... just amazing :D

Posted 23 March 2014 at 04:10 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Allie

This has been happening to me for years. I see the number 11, 1:11, 11:11 all the time, not every day. I was so amazed as to why this happens to me, if I am the only one to see this so I googled it and found out that there are more people with the same phenomenon. There is also a site dedicated to it, I am not a cult joiner but it was good to know I was not alone.

I have also noticed that when the TV plays in the background and I write something in the computer the same word I write I hear on the TV almost simultaneously.

I don't know how to explain these phenomena in my life, I just take them in as cosmic coincidences, as my connection to the universe, a sign of alignment..... I close my eyes I acknowledge the moment and give thanks.

Posted 23 March 2014 at 10:34 am in response to The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon

person

scottmcl said: "PresMatt
Canada didn't become as sovereign nation until 1867. In 1814 the lines between British/Canadian was not well defined at all (unless you were first Nations.)

And your point about "America saved Canada from Hitler in WWII!" makes absolutely NO SENCE!"

Says the person who does not spell *sense* correctly.

Posted 22 March 2014 at 11:37 pm in response to America's Secret Plan to Invade Canada

Alex

This qoute, has got to be one of the funniest and yet scientificly correct statments made on the internet

hydrogen--an odorless, colorless gas which tends to turn into a universe if left alone for a prolonged period

Posted 22 March 2014 at 09:17 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Luka D'Odessa

Alan Bellows said: "Bryan Lowder said: "See this link: Link"

Are you suggesting that Hufu IS human flesh, cleverly disguised as tofu which has been cleverly disguised as human flesh!!?? It can't be true! It just CAN'T!
Or, it can."

Posted 22 March 2014 at 02:32 pm in response to The Great Taste of Human Flesh, Without the Guilt

jerome

Your description of hydrogen is absolutely brillant !

Posted 22 March 2014 at 02:28 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Dave

This by far is my favorite site, and I have donated enough for the book and the MP3s. Both well worth it and then some in my opinion. I appreciate your work to continue providing quality little known facts to the rest of us that are damn interested. :)

If you love it - support it, and I do/will. Thank you and keep up the excellent work I absolutely love it.

BTW... there are some Podcast Players for Android people like myself like iPP Podcast Player. I only have 1 subscription and that is DamnIntersting! :)

Posted 21 March 2014 at 05:29 pm in response to The Damn Interesting Article Accelerator

Jim

You guys think a ten-thousandth of a nano-Kelvin is cold?

Obviously, none of you have ever met my ex-wife.

;-)

Jim
Sunk New Dawn
Galveston, TX

Posted 21 March 2014 at 04:36 pm in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Heather Jamieson

YAY new article. Thanks Marisa! I can only imagine how those men would be fighting over an island that magically appeared. Very cool.

Posted 21 March 2014 at 11:22 am in response to It Came from Beneath the Sea

Heather Jamieson

LOVE THIS WEBSITE and happy to hear that there are plans for growth. I rated on iTunes. Keep up the good work!!!

Posted 21 March 2014 at 11:06 am in response to The Damn Interesting Article Accelerator

HiEv

The modest amount of the stuff he had been able to collect behaved very curiously in general, flowing with strange characteristics and evading easy observation as if enveloped in an SEP field.

Heh... Nice "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" reference. Took me a moment to recognize the reference to the "Someone Else's Problem" field.

Interesting article, especially how the social aspects may have affected the science as well.

Side note: Technically there are "negative Kelvin" temperatures, but oddly enough they're not found below absolute zero. Despite what the phrase might lead you to believe, "negative Kelvin" temperatures are actually absurdly hot, somewhere over infinity Kelvin. This is because of a very weird quantum effect, where some quantum system's temperatures can be so hot that they decrease their entropy as more energy as added, instead of increasing their entropy as we normally observe. It's kind of like getting to a level so high in "Pac-Man" that the game starts acting weird. These ultra-high temperatures are referred to as "negative temperatures" on the Kelvin scale. See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_temperature

Posted 21 March 2014 at 10:32 am in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Michnu

Excellent article! It occurs to me that the described technology could be put to more practical use. Perhaps in the cooling of homes on hot summer days. Sort of air conditioning.......oh....wait a minute. How about for the chilling of liquid refreshments then? Dewar's Scotch Whiskey springs to mind for some reason.

Posted 21 March 2014 at 04:39 am in response to Absolute Zero is 0K

Kyle

I hope my comment dosen't get banned from thinking *outside the box* due to knowing not only scripture but other prophecies in other ancient groups where there is many similarities if you look hard enough.

Posted 21 March 2014 at 03:28 am in response to Number Stations

Kyle

It is secret agents plotting how to form the New World Order and organize terrorist attacks! Some succeed and others either half succeed or fail.

The USA gets money from the drug trafficking department which is why they 1. Don't take our border situation seriously on the Mexico side and 2. We always seem to have the same kind of President with a different face since the Cold War era.

Elections are rigged on both sides and the outcome is determined LONG before you go vote and they often count dead people in the vote.

The Liberals have been caught using fake names like Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck to squeeze in extra votes to vote in Obama the first time around and Conservative Talk Hosts had a good laugh about it but nobody did anything serious about stopping it.

However how can you stop it with the same kind of mindsets that started it?

Posted 21 March 2014 at 03:27 am in response to Number Stations

Passenger

This reminds me of 3 similar American late-1940s projects for huge double-decker propeller airliners. These were the Lockheed Constitution, the original Douglas DC7, and the North American C-49 (I believe) which was a passenger variant of the huge B36 bomber. All 3 of these designs had prototypes built for USAF, which served as military transports, and all 3 were encouraged by PanAm Airlines which placed tentative orders. But, PanAm soon decided the transatlantic passenger market was too small to justify, and cancelled the orders.

Posted 20 March 2014 at 08:00 pm in response to The Plane That Flew Too Soon

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