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The Hutchison Effect

Article #165 • Written by Alan Bellows

Ice Cream being levitated by the Hutchison Effect
Ice Cream being levitated by the Hutchison Effect

An inventor in Canada named John Hutchison is credited with one of science's most unusual and controversial discoveries. It is described as a "highly-anomalous electromagnetic effect which causes the jellification of metals, spontaneous levitation of common substances, and other effects." It is known as the Hutchison Effect, or the H-Effect for short.

What the H-Effect is purported to do is nothing short of extraordinary. It is said to cause objects to defy gravity, cause metal to spontaneously fracture, cause dissimilar materials to fuse (such as metal and wood), and other strange phenomena. Hutchison has captured the effect on video many times, and claims to have demonstrated it for scientists from U.S. Army intelligence. But the claims are mired in doubt because the effect is not reproducible, even by the discoverer himself.

Hutchison is a bit of an eccentric, conducting his experiments in his apartment using surplus Navy and Army electronic equipment. His living space is absolutely crowded with oscilloscopes, digital readouts, gauges, switches, lights, receiver dishes, chains, and all manner of hardware. His supporters often liken him to the brilliant scientist and inventor Nikola Tesla, and in fact it was during an attempt to reproduce one of Tesla's experiments that the H-Effect was said to have been accidentally discovered.

Hutchison's experiments utilized multiple electrical coils called Tesla coils, as well as a static electricity machine called a Van de Graaf generator. How these high-voltage devices work in concert to create the H-Effect is uncertain, but supporters believe that a hypothetical electromagnetic wave called a scalar wave allowed Hutchison's apparatus to tap an exotic energy called zero-point energy.

Zero-point energy is the energy present at zero degrees Kelvin zero Kelvins, the temperature at which all activity in an atom supposedly ceases. It is also called vacuum energy because it is descriptive of the energy in a perfect vacuum, where no light or matter is present. In this state, random electromagnetic oscillations can still be observed, meaning that there is still some amount of energy present. Essentially, the concept of tapping zero-point energy assumes that the universe is saturated in a constant background energy which we cannot observe because it is present everywhere, even within ourselves and our measuring devices. If such energy exists, it could be an enormous amount... it is theorized that there is enough energy in the volume the size of a coffee cup to completely boil away Earth’s oceans.

John Hutchison in his apartment/laboratory
John Hutchison in his apartment/laboratory

Much of the criticism of Hutchison's work stems from the shortage of impartial third-party observations, and by the fact that the H-Effect has not yet been reproduced elsewhere. There are several demonstration videos supposedly showing the phenomena, including a few short videos online and some more involved footage which he sells by mail-order for up to $150. The online videos indeed feature close-up shots of objects which appear to be levitating and moving in strange ways, but many suspect that his levitation tricks are fakery.

One suggestion made by skeptics is that Hutchison uses an electromagnet on the ceiling, and places hidden pieces of metal inside objects so they will be attracted to the magnet. He could then film the objects with an upside-down camera as he powers down the electromagnet, making the objects on film appear to float up and out of the shot when in reality they are falling down to the floor. Many of the videos include conspicuous objects in the scene which do not move (such as an old broom), which could be deliberately attached to add to the illusion that the camera is not upside-down. Critics also point out that the videos do not show what happens to the objects after they levitate.

One particularly damning piece of evidence against him is a video he produced for a television special which shows a toy UFO levitating and jumping around wildly. A string is clearly visible in the upper left-hand corner of the video, wiggling in sync with the UFO's movements. At first Hutchison claimed that it was a wire which was part of the apparatus, but later he confessed that he was "creative" with the footage because he has been unable to reproduce the effect since 1991.

Given that Hutchison's claims are outlandish and his credibility damaged by admitted fakery, it is likely that the effect named for him is complete claptrap. Carl Sagan famously said that "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence," and Hutchison offers no such evidence aside from easily faked videos and unsubstantiated claims. But much valuable science has been done by eccentrics who are mocked by the rest of the scientific community in their time... so it is possible that his claims are indeed valid. Science is half skepticism and half open-mindedness, so as much as I doubt the veracity of Hutchison's claims, at the same time I would be delighted to be proven wrong.

Article written by Alan Bellows, published on 17 April 2006. Alan is the founder/designer/head writer/managing editor of Damn Interesting.

Article design by Alan Bellows. Suggested by Debbie Hall.
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78 Comments
CanadianNate
Posted 17 April 2006 at 07:10 pm

I thought no scientist has ever been able to create zero degrees kelvin, although I know they've gotten pretty damn close(within a few thousandths of a degrree), in a controlled environment using lasers to slow down molecules, so I'm wondering how he was able to(or claims to) tap the zero point energy that comes with it...?


Anthony Kendall
Posted 17 April 2006 at 07:20 pm

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!


dysan
Posted 17 April 2006 at 07:56 pm

CanadianNate said: "I thought no scientist has ever been able to create zero degrees kelvin, although I know they've gotten pretty damn close(within a few thousandths of a degrree), in a controlled environment using lasers to slow down molecules, so I'm wondering how he was able to(or claims to) tap the zero point energy that comes with it…?"

You don't have to have something at 0 degrees kelvin to extract zero point energy, The definition of it is just the energy that is left when you cool something to 0 degrees kelvin.


mrbiotech
Posted 17 April 2006 at 07:57 pm

In the linked WMV demonstration video of the levitating thing with the blinkey-red light PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE UPPER-LEFT HAND CORNER.... The pendulum-like oscillations of the "levitating" object become clearer than the fishing-line. :)

And still and interesting read!


esoteric
Posted 17 April 2006 at 08:20 pm

I was worried for a little bit... but glad that you had some nice skepticism going on... :) Yes, it'd be very cool, but without replicability, I can't personally spend too much time on this...

Btw, can anybody actually satisfactorily explain what the heck a "scalar wave" is? It gets mentioned heaps in the fringe ZP, kealynet, etc circles, but I've never seen a real scientific explaination of what it actually is. I understand the term "scalar" in reference to geometry, and "wave" is obvious, but put them together and it doesn't appear so obvious to me.


SparkyTWP
Posted 17 April 2006 at 08:25 pm

The general population has this romatic idea of some lone genius in a basement who turns science on its head. It's never true. This may have been true in the dawn of science where a lot of discoveries did not need advanced equipment or manpower, but it's not true now. Every breakthrough requires unbelievably expensive equipment and is built on the work of others. Note that this does not count conceptual discoveries such as relativity or math theories.

The guy is just a salesman with crap to sell. Just film some neat footage, talk about rewriting science, add a few big words that few people know the meaning of, then add a conspiracy theory or two, and people will just eat it up.

CanadianNate said: "I thought no scientist has ever been able to create zero degrees kelvin, although I know they've gotten pretty damn close(within a few thousandths of a degrree)"

Within a few trillionths of absolute zero actually. The record holder is currently 100pK (10^-10).


SparkyTWP
Posted 17 April 2006 at 08:39 pm

esoteric said: Btw, can anybody actually satisfactorily explain what the heck a "scalar wave" is?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalar_wave

I tried to read one of the referenced sources at the bottom, and a lot of it sounded made up and didn't make any sense.


ballaerina
Posted 17 April 2006 at 08:40 pm

As an observer, that looks pretty BS to me. But hey, I'm not a scientist.


Oax
Posted 17 April 2006 at 10:36 pm

I always thought that the proof of something was that it had to be reproducible


Abu Ibrahim
Posted 17 April 2006 at 10:39 pm

Yup it does sound like bogus to me. The picture in the article seems to show a hidden spoon soaked with ice cream being elevated probably by a magnet.

To me, this guy looks like a shaved wedding-dress guy than a scientist. http://www.snopes.com/love/revenge/weddress.asp


grey matter
Posted 17 April 2006 at 10:42 pm

that guy looks like a fraud to me


paintist
Posted 17 April 2006 at 10:57 pm

Don't judge a mad scientist by his hair.


white_matter
Posted 17 April 2006 at 11:02 pm

He looks less like a scientist and more like a roadie.

Besides, he's Canadian. 'Nuff said.


rp2
Posted 17 April 2006 at 11:22 pm

white_matter said: "Besides, he's Canadian. 'Nuff said."

ohh nice! you're going to get it now


APA7HY
Posted 18 April 2006 at 01:58 am

The picture of our "genius" included in the article made me laugh so hard. It reminds me of some science fiction movie from the 80's. Or the inside of the De Lorean from Back to the Future. Hahaha. I can't stop laughing.


Marius
Posted 18 April 2006 at 03:56 am

If this really is 'anti-gravity' why would the objects go up? I would imagine that an object, suddenly released from the bonds of gravity, would start moving in a straight line relative to the spin of the Earth, yes?


Furnace
Posted 18 April 2006 at 04:04 am

SparkyTWP said: "Every breakthrough requires unbelievably expensive equipment and is built on the work of others."

This is not necessarily true. Discoveries tend to lie in a direction that's understandable to us at the time, but the science is always there. For example, take those novelty clocks you can power with a potato. Scientists weren't looking for energy in potatoes, but once the fine details were discovered and understood, they could pick one up and say, "Check this out! Energy!" ...but if you went back in time, told them to focus their efforts on potatoes and citrus fruit, they'd make the discovery using household items.

I'm very, very confident there are energy sources just waiting to be found, and once they are, they will be accessible through very simple means. Whether they are discovered that way is unknown, but it will always be a possibility.


1c3d0g
Posted 18 April 2006 at 04:07 am

White_Matter: please keep your racist remarks to yourself (and no, I'm not Canadian, but I have good Canadian friends).

Damn it, for a minute there I thought someone stumbled onto one of the world's greatest discoveries of all time...too bad it smells like Snake Oil (to me), although I'm certainly no scientist.


Taphophile
Posted 18 April 2006 at 04:39 am

In matters of the paranormal and weird science, I like to defer to The Amazing Randi. Although he doesn't seem to have explored Mr. (Dr.?) Hutchison's work, it doesn't look like he thinks much of it. See: http://www.randi.org/jr/121302.html. The comment on Hutchison is near the bottom of the article. As always, your article on Hutchison is DI!!


another viewpoint
Posted 18 April 2006 at 05:04 am

...what do you want from a guy that has a likeness to Emo Phillips or Dr. Who?

As for zero degrees kelvin...every guy knows how cold this is and how easily this temperature can be reproduced in real life...in particular while dating!


wileybot
Posted 18 April 2006 at 06:26 am

I am going to step out on limb an predict (based on his appearance) that in 1991 Hutchison did perform this experiment sucessfully, at least he "thinks" he did. I am also going to speculate he was quit "baked" at the time. :)


Haywood Jablome
Posted 18 April 2006 at 08:00 am

mrbiotech said: "In the linked WMV demonstration video of the levitating thing with the blinkey-red light PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE UPPER-LEFT HAND CORNER…. The pendulum-like oscillations of the "levitating" object become clearer than the fishing-line. :)


And still and interesting read!"

Did you even read the article?

"One particularly damning piece of evidence against him is a video he produced for a television special which shows a toy UFO levitating and jumping around wildly. A string is clearly visible in the upper left-hand corner of the video, wiggling in sync with the UFO's movements. At first Hutchison claimed that it was a wire which was part of the apparatus, but later he confessed that he was "creative" with the footage because he has been unable to reproduce the effect since 1991. "


SparkyTWP
Posted 18 April 2006 at 08:13 am

Furnace said: "For example, take those novelty clocks you can power with a potato. Scientists weren't looking for energy in potatoes, but once the fine details were discovered and understood, they could pick one up and say, "Check this out! Energy!"

Yes, but this is hardly groundbreaking. The voltaic pile (which uses the same chemical reaction to make electricity) was invented over 200 years ago.

What I was trying to say was that the discovery of something revolutionary such as a new force or energy source would probably not be discovered in some guy's apartment, mostly for the fact that forces that can be observed on the human scale have already been described very well with current theories. I'm not saying it's impossible, but I would be very skeptical about it.

Currently, all the candidates for a new possible force are in the very large distance scale, such as the Pioneer anomaly or Dark Energy. In the end, I think both of these could be explained by modifications to existing theory or from new observations rather than creating a new theory.


Carcer
Posted 18 April 2006 at 09:15 am

Look, dammit, just because someone is "baked" at the time doesn't mean they didn't make the ice cream fly around the room......wait, what?


AKALucifer
Posted 18 April 2006 at 09:29 am

wileybot said: "I am going to step out on limb an predict (based on his appearance) that in 1991 Hutchison did perform this experiment sucessfully, at least he "thinks" he did. I am also going to speculate he was quit "baked" at the time. :)"

LMAO

We don't know that much about Zero point energy so it's possible he did do the experiment but since then conditions have changed. I heard about a reaction that someone discovered and it could only be replicated in some labs this was because the glass test tube that the person used had trace elements of carbon that acted as a catalyst in the reaction whereas other labs used different glass so the experiment didn't work.


karphi
Posted 18 April 2006 at 09:31 am

1.21 gigawatts!! Great Scott!!

I bet where he's going, he doesn't need roads.


another viewpoint
Posted 18 April 2006 at 09:52 am

Luke...beware of the Dark Side.

...Rocks are the most intelligent beings on this good earth and in all the universe. There is no mathematical expression they cannot compute. There is no algorithm they cannot solve. And perform calculations at speeds even faster than the most super of all supercomputers today. They do however...have a lousy input/output system. Remember pet rocks?


Carcer
Posted 18 April 2006 at 12:52 pm

Everyone leave Lazlo alone. He's this close to winning that RV and all those other fabulous prizes, and taking that wierdly hot blonde off into the sunset as Tears for Fears plays in the background.


tza
Posted 18 April 2006 at 01:50 pm

I think he was an idiot for releasing that video.. seriously.. did he even WATCH it?


white_matter
Posted 18 April 2006 at 03:51 pm

1c3d0g said: "White_Matter: please keep your racist remarks to yourself (and no, I'm not Canadian, but I have good Canadian friends)."

Lets see: African-American, Caucasian, Latino and...Canadian? Canadian is a race now?

If you're going to use words like us big boys use, make sure you use them right.

Idiot.


Bru
Posted 18 April 2006 at 05:18 pm

BTW, the Kelvin temperature scale is not measured in degrees. Therefore, the correct way to state absolute zero is "zero Kelvins." Other temperatures using this scale are read in the same manner, e.g., 350 Kelvins, 19 Kelvins, etc.


timhickey
Posted 18 April 2006 at 08:49 pm

In my opinion DamnInteresting is at its best when it covers phenomena that are a) little-known and b) indubitably true. Covering items like the Hutchison Effect that are probably false detracts from the rest of the site. A bit like hearing a great urban legend and then finding out it's false....

Overall a great site though!


nutritionalalchemist
Posted 18 April 2006 at 09:14 pm

There is no spoon......eh

Oh, and I kinda have to believe the Canadians are a race....extraterestrial race, but a race none the less....
; )


Byrden
Posted 19 April 2006 at 01:04 am

John Hutchison, stop fooling around with strings. Your true calling in life is impersonating Mr. Spock.


Bryan Lowder
Posted 19 April 2006 at 10:46 am

Rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated.

Bah. Crackpots like this are a dime a dozen. Check out the KeelyNet.

Admittedly, **UNPROVEN CLAIMS** are usually interesting, but I find stuff like this dull. My BS detector goes crazy when somebody claims to be able to do things that are silly, like make irons stick to their hands or mix wood and metal.


Lurker
Posted 19 April 2006 at 11:39 am

I question his taste in ice cream.


mudpuppy555
Posted 19 April 2006 at 12:00 pm

I wonder if he has several sea bass hooked up with laser beams.


1c3d0g
Posted 20 April 2006 at 06:12 am

White_Matter: shut your stupid little trap before someone does it for you. Jerk.


rp2
Posted 20 April 2006 at 10:08 am

1c3d0g said: "White_Matter: shut your stupid little trap before someone does it for you. Jerk."

watch out white_matter, I feel a scalar wave coming! rawr


joethecoat
Posted 20 April 2006 at 06:54 pm

A scalar wave seems to imply its a wave with no direction... but couldn't that just be a badly observed standing wave?


joethecoat
Posted 20 April 2006 at 06:56 pm

JustAnotherName
Posted 22 April 2006 at 06:01 am

another viewpoint said: "As for zero degrees kelvin…every guy knows how cold this is and how easily this temperature can be reproduced in real life…in particular while dating!"

ROFL - I usually don't get the jokes in here as you have to understand too many "basic" scientific STUFF.


801210
Posted 23 April 2006 at 08:36 am

I'm a scientist....Well not really, I lied......**shifty eyes**


ronmojohny
Posted 23 April 2006 at 07:46 pm

That just goes to show that we know very little about magnetism.

mapquest


AzureKevin
Posted 26 April 2006 at 07:16 pm

That video looks really sketchy.


paalexan
Posted 02 May 2006 at 07:57 pm

"Essentially, the concept of tapping zero-point energy assumes that the universe is saturated in a constant background energy which we cannot observe because it is present everywhere, even within ourselves and our measuring devices."

The name for phenomena that show no spatiotemporal variation is: nonexistent.


th3nom4d
Posted 30 May 2006 at 03:12 pm

paalexan's comment is most interesting. big words that say one thing: Some 'thing' that is always exactly the same, no matter where it is found, everywhere, does not really exist. This is really an amazing thought, but what about some basic building block, that is existent everywhere? Does the quark not exist simply because a quark is always exactly the same everywhere? or are you inclined to assert that they are only 'the same' according to present knowledge... if so, according to present knowledge this zero-point energy does no exist in the same sense that the quark did not exist 40 years ago. This guy, Hutchinson, is obvioulsy a quack- he admitted to forging some video 'proof'. But, the concept of zero point energy does not belong to him. And it is a pretty amazing conpect.


KJK::Hyperion
Posted 07 June 2006 at 12:33 pm

I recall the "scalar wave" theory postulates the existence of longitudinal electromagnetic waves. So far, only transversal waves have been observed, and as far as waves go, this is an anomaly, so "naturally" they must be there and we just don't know how to observe them


tigoldbitty
Posted 10 July 2006 at 09:54 pm

This is brilliant! This man has come up with a proven and repeatable way of saving energy by utilizing a type of energy that is not really understood by the general public. He saves so much energy, not having to work for a living. Truly brillian.


Albert Mond
Posted 26 July 2006 at 12:35 pm

While I'm not sure I can say that I think he's actually produced the effect, I think whatever he says creates it, is true.


nutramistic
Posted 24 August 2006 at 10:12 am

I like the cut of your jib. You should be a door-to-door door and doorbell salesman.


Sleestak
Posted 02 September 2006 at 08:16 am

Didn't anyone notice the "experiment" was set up in a box? With a camera mounted to it? With the box turned upside down?


tigoldbitty
Posted 29 September 2006 at 03:58 pm

That would explain why the drop forms on one side. The box flippage action causes this, along with image blur. It would do the integrity of this site well to have this article removed.


me09
Posted 26 November 2006 at 01:22 pm

AzureKevin said: "That video looks really sketchy."

Hutchison looks sketchy himself...


GeoGrapher
Posted 30 November 2006 at 07:04 pm

Go to about 1:45 into the video. Is it just me, or does it look like they are just using a thin stick with a ball on the end to pull out the liquidy, ice creamy looking stuff?


blenderhead
Posted 23 February 2007 at 09:11 am

Maybe Rosie O'Donnell is hiding under the table, and the ice cream is defying gravity trying to escape.


!xoEldon
Posted 14 March 2007 at 05:10 am

Weird... When I first heard of the H-effect I interpreted it as using energy to match the frequency of the object, and slowly increasing it until the mass turns into energy therefore coming closer to light, or higher frequency giving it the ability to float. Which I wouldn't call zero point energy.

SparkyTWP said: "The general population has this romatic idea of some lone genius in a basement who turns science on its head. It's never true. This may have been true in the dawn of science where a lot of discoveries did not need advanced equipment or manpower, but it's not true now. Every breakthrough requires unbelievably expensive equipment and is built on the work of others."

Though I don't think you could be more wrong. I believe "Expensive Equipment" is nothing without the mind behind it. The only thing holding us back technologically is the human brain. I also strongly believe the universe of information is at our finger tips if we could only open up our minds enough to access it.


kenfo
Posted 08 April 2007 at 11:49 am

You can trust my judgements on this issue. The U.N. scientific community has issued a strong statement of consensus backed by correlational data to prove I am, in fact, a "scientist".

The string was not moving the UFO, but rather was also levitating. The scalar wave causes the objects to move in a fashion which, to the unscientifical mindly, looks contrived.

I duplicated this experiment by tossing cats out of highrise buildings. They all crashed to the ground, thereby proving the experimental datum. Oddly though, the surviving cats avoided me at all costs afterward. Something to do with electro-magnetic polarity? Scalar wave experiments such as this have an attractive-force-property regarding policemen and spca agents. They are probably Canadians. I'll get back to you when I better understand this phenomenon better.

Lastly, Canadians and midgets cannot be trusted. You might wonder "but kenfo, what about Canadian midgets?". That is a double negative and can not occur outside the realm of the event horizon of a super massive black hole, and then only for a pico-second. Here is a clarifying link: http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4109/446/1600/MC967.jpg This is me with one of my cat subjects. You don't see any Canadian midgets, do you? Well then, there you have it.


pogmog
Posted 15 April 2007 at 01:36 am

Marius said: "If this really is 'anti-gravity' why would the objects go up? I would imagine that an object, suddenly released from the bonds of gravity, would start moving in a straight line relative to the spin of the Earth, yes?"

Yeah it should... at a right angle from the acceleration (gravity). Along the equator the earth spins at 1,670 kph... I don't think you want play with anti-gravity....


mercforhire
Posted 08 May 2007 at 01:02 am

This guy is a nut-case. But, actually, many great scientists are/were. Hutchison's not one of them however. Look through his site & forum & you'll see what I'm talking about. Some of his worshippers are "scientists" that have invented "levitation" devices, which work on the concept of the Joules-Lenz Law....only they don't realize that what they ave "invented", was known about 175 years ago.

He also offered his entire lab on Ebay a short while ago for $8 Mil....no bidders. The 3 simultaneous auctions for the same thing looked to have been put together by an illiterate 8th-grader.

Hutchison IS an inventor, who stumbled onto something he thought was neat. Only he doesn't realize that his inventions are things that other more reputable scientists have known about for decades....mostly electro-magnetism. He then joined the "Free-Energy" & Conspiracy-Theory-For-Everything-Crowd, which opened up a large audience willing to believe anything he could show them....& they will also pay to see him levitate his toy UFO's with a piece of string & make bars of metal glow red-hot by hooking them to a welder, so he quickly learned to take advantage of this.

Oh yeah...he also has "solved" the mystery of the Ark of the Covenant & actually made one that worked, along with a few other things we don't quite have the answer for......shades of Ron Wyatt.


Cdn Sarge
Posted 11 June 2007 at 02:07 pm

White-Matter wrote: "Lets see: African-American, Caucasian, Latino and…Canadian? Canadian is a race now?

"If you're going to use words like us big boys use, make sure you use them right.

"Idiot."

Good advice, White_Matter. Any idea when you intend to follow it yourself? Latinos don't comprise their own distinct "race," either. They're caucasian.

Moron.


Conservatif
Posted 27 December 2007 at 05:53 pm

joethecoat said: "A scalar wave seems to imply its a wave with no direction... but couldn't that just be a badly observed standing wave?"

If he's referring to a wave in a scalar field, that's different from a wave with no direction. The scalar field itself has no directional element: a pressure field is a scalar field, because pressure has a magnitude component but no directional component. A temperature field is the same way. There could still be a wave in a pressure field or a temperature field: I'm pretty sure you can think of sound waves or a shock wave from an explosion as a wave in a pressure field. Those sorts of waves in a scalar field will have a direction of propagation; it's the field that has no direction.


Atomizer
Posted 01 June 2008 at 09:50 pm

First of all... wait, no, I'll get back to 'first of all.'

Second, thank you kenfo for injecting some airtight logic into this comment section. I appreciate it, personally.

But first, why does race become an issue here? Canadians are not a race; they are just colder than us Americans. They approach zero Kelvins sooner than most because of the jet stream, but are overall a decent people. I do not think name calling is exactly the kind of forum in which most of the Damn Interested care to participate. IMHO

Keep it clean, keep it interesting. *shrug*

I personally love Hutchinson's hair. It's very "scarecrow."


Atomizer
Posted 01 June 2008 at 09:52 pm

"[Due to excessive links or the presence of certain words that smell of spam, your comment has been placed in a temporary holding cell. If it's not spam, it'll show up right here real soon.]"

Hey, just because I live in Hawaii, doesn't mean everything has to do with Spam!


BenKinsey
Posted 12 September 2008 at 11:45 am

That ufo video was absolutely hilarious. Why wouldn't he angle the camera away from the string. If you didn't see the video yet maybe you should this guy is such a joke.


Ted
Posted 25 December 2008 at 12:00 pm

white_matter said: "Lets see: African-American, Caucasian, Latino and…Canadian? Canadian is a race now?

If you're going to use words like us big boys use, make sure you use them right.

Idiot."

Cdn Sarge said: "White-Matter wrote: "Lets see: African-American, Caucasian, Latino and…Canadian? Canadian is a race now?

"If you're going to use words like us big boys use, make sure you use them right.

"Idiot."

Good advice, White_Matter. Any idea when you intend to follow it yourself? Latinos don't comprise their own distinct "race," either. They're caucasian.

Moron."

I just thought this was kinda funny: don't people conventionally put their names at the end of their comment?

Ted


bloop2
Posted 26 January 2009 at 02:25 am

He made yor mum float xD


wayno@oz
Posted 01 April 2009 at 11:49 pm

Beep beep beep! Crackpot alert! Although i love the guys idea's. BTW, how do i get my hands on old navy & military hardware? Is it still possible post 9/11? Who pays his power bills and where does he live cause i certainly dont wont to be living anywhere near this guy for fear of a horrible electrcution death!


Joe
Posted 25 January 2014 at 04:40 pm

SparkyTWP said: "The general population has this romatic idea of some lone genius in a basement who turns science on its head. It's never true. This may have been true in the dawn of science where a lot of discoveries did not need advanced equipment or manpower, but it's not true now. Every breakthrough requires unbelievably expensive equipment and is built on the work of others. Note that this does not count conceptual discoveries such as relativity or math theories.

The guy is just a salesman with crap to sell. Just film some neat footage, talk about rewriting science, add a few big words that few people know the meaning of, then add a conspiracy theory or two, and people will just eat it up.
CanadianNate said: "I thought no scientist has ever been able to create zero degrees kelvin, although I know they've gotten pretty damn close(within a few thousandths of a degrree)"
Within a few trillionths of absolute zero actually. The record holder is currently 100pK (10^-10)."

Tesla, turned what you call science. Up side down. it's just that the greedy bankers,could not figure how to meter it out for $$$. That's why, his amazing research was shelved. by this Nations. Keepers


Joe
Posted 25 January 2014 at 04:57 pm

You here are probably still mocking Cold Fusion.

"Cold Fusion" Pons and Fleischman got it right sort of say NASA MIT Stanford etc.

The academic scientist cannot ever admit they were wrong! They have been given a billion dollars,to do what Pons and Fleishman done with a shoestring budget. It embarrasses them. Rightly so, for most are useless.

They waste money very well, they hold to the old warn out scientific laws. That by the new findings,have been turned up side down. On their, overly educated
heads.


Seventhdegree
Posted 05 March 2014 at 06:17 pm

CanadianNate said: "I thought no scientist has ever been able to create zero degrees kelvin, although I know they've gotten pretty damn close(within a few thousandths of a degrree), in a controlled environment using lasers to slow down molecules, so I'm wondering how he was able to(or claims to) tap the zero point energy that comes with it...?"

Zero Point energy is everywhere regardless because it's the result of vacuum fluctuations waves that create quantum particles it's just that it's the only thing left in a complete vacuum where no matter or heat exist.


Loomis Webb
Posted 11 May 2014 at 04:23 am

'The Hutchison Effect' has generated a large amount of parallel empirical evidence, that contributes to the large body of empirical evidence from 9/11. In other words, on top of all the empirical evidence directly from 9/11, there are also laboratory generated anomalies, using directed energy, that are strikingly similar to what we see at ground zero after 9/11. Perhaps these technologies are related in some way, perhaps they are not, but either way, these strong correlations are important and must be considered due to the numerous similarities between 'The Hutchison Effect' and what occurred on 9/11.

John Hutchison has submitted a sworn affidavit to the courts to legally testify to the validity of his informal research. See a copy of the official affadavit here (from his website): http://www.thehutchisoneffect.com/docs/AffJHutchison4.pdf

Lockheed Martin aerospace and weapons corporation is also interested in 'The Hutchison Effect'. Boyd Bushman, a Senior Scientist of Lockheed Martin, on The Hutchison Effect: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57ZKTA7nx8U

More information on 'The Hutchison Effect' and other related topics can be found below:

John Hutchison 2008 Seattle Presentation [Documentary | 68m]: http://blip.tv/checktheevidence/john-hutchison-seattle-in-2008-5880558

The Hutchison Effect - Science Channel Documentary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8PVFgjDyBo

The Hutchison Effect & Free Energy - LightworksAV Documentary (Part 2 of 2): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P79KBbBc8Co

The Hutchison Effect - Iron Bar Warping (Recent Experiment): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnBdhsXl088

The Hutchison Effect - Compilation Video Documentary http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj93HaGKV3g

Nikola Tesla Discovered Free Energy Technology & JP Morgan Suppressed It [7m]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIi0PGlPyKA

The Missing Secrets of Nikola Tesla [Documentary | 47m]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5uiK_QnyrE

Lt. Colonel Tom Bearden U.S. Army (ret.) - Soviet Weather Engineering Over North America / Scalar Energy Weapons [Documentary | 62mins]: http://www.cheniere.org/video/sovietweathervideo.html

CBS '60 Minutes' - Cold Fusion, More Than Junk Science: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyNn_Z6wCIk

Heavy Watergate: The War on Cold Fusion [Documentary | 45m]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htgV7fNO-2k

Action 6 News Segment on Stanley Meyers Water Powered Car [2m]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFIlXaABU54

Stanley Meyers 1992 Water Powered Car Interview [37m]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vd7QL1-NnlU

Lightworks AV 'Free Energy the Race to Zero Point' [Documentary | 110m]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlvFZnBRHnc

DOCUMENTS:

Letter from the U.S. Army reminding Mr. Hutchison that the information regarding The Hutchison Effect is 'Classified': http://www.thehutchisoneffect.com/docs/Hutch%20Letters2.pdf

Letter from Electric Spacecraft Journal of Research containing information that was submitted to NASA for use in improving anti-gravity spacecraft propulsion technologies: http://www.thehutchisoneffect.com/docs/Hutchison%20Effect%20-%20More%20Info.pdf

Document from The Planetary Association for Clean Energy, discussing possible theories behind how The Hutchison Effect is generated, and all sorts of other relevant information, including a time line of relevant events concerning John Hutchison and The Hutchison Effect: http://www.thehutchisoneffect.com/docs/The%20Hutchison%20Effect%20File.pdf

Document from Nuclear Physicist, Dr. Robert Koontz Ph.D, testifying to the validity of The Hutchison Effect: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ha9bs6y6yf3tueg/Koontz.jpg

Document from the Canadian Department of National Defense, discussing some of their equipment that Mr. Hutchison has used to generate the anomalies of The Hutchison Effect: https://www.dropbox.com/s/tlj73rpmm1p64ji/CanadaDND.jpg

Document showing that some of Mr. Hutchison's research has been submitted to NASA: https://www.dropbox.com/s/bjgv26czl5pmlio/ESJ-NASA.jpg

Letter to NASA briefly discussing The Hutchison Effect and its potential application for space exploration, and it also mentions that Mr. Hutchison's experiments have been successfully replicated by Toronto researcher George Hathaway: https://www.dropbox.com/s/i8udsbc3l2h1sas/LetterToNasa.jpg

The Hutchison Effect - An Explanation
by Mark A. Solis
from: http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/Thinktank/8863/HEffect1.html

People often ask, "What exactly is the Hutchison Effect?" This brief essay is an attempt to answer that question to the satisfaction of the majority.

First of all, the Hutchison Effect is a collection of phenomena which were discovered accidentally by John Hutchison during attempts to study the longitudinal waves of Tesla back in 1979. In other words, the Hutchison Effect is not simply a singular effect. It is many.

The Hutchison Effect occurs as the result of radio wave interferences in a zone of spatial volume encompassed by high voltage sources, usually a Van de Graff generator, and two or more Tesla coils.

The effects produced include levitation of heavy objects, fusion of dissimilar materials such as metal and wood (exactly as portrayed in the movie, "The Philadelphia Experiment"), the anomalous heating of metals without burning adjacent material, spontaneous fracturing of metals (which separate by sliding in a sideways fashion), and both temporary and permanent changes in the crystalline structure and physical properties of metals.

The levitation of heavy objects by the Hutchison Effect is not---repeat not---the result of simple electrostatic or electromagnetic levitation. Claims that these forces alone can explain the phenomenon are patently ridiculous, and easily disproved by merely trying to use such methods to duplicate what the Hutchison Effect has achieved, which has been well documented both on film and videotape, and has been witnessed many times by numerous credentialed scientists and engineers. Challengers should note that their apparatus must be limited to the use of 75 Watts of power from a 120 Volt AC outlet, as that is all that is used by Hutchison's apparatus to levitate a 60-pound cannon ball.

The fusion of dissimilar materials, which is exceedingly remarkable, indicates clearly that the Hutchison Effect has a powerful influence on Van der Waals forces. In a striking and baffling contradiction, dissimilar substances can simply "come together," yet the individual substances do not dissociate. A block of wood can simply "sink into" a metal bar, yet neither the metal bar nor the block of wood come apart. Also, there is no evidence of displacement, such as would occur if, for example, one were to sink a stone into a bowl of water.

The anomalous heating of metal without any evidence of burning or scorching of the adjacent materials (usually wood) is a clear indication that possibly the nature of heat may not be completely understood. This has far-reaching implications for thermodynamics, which hinges entirely on the presumption of such knowledge. It should be noted that the entirety of thermodynamics is represented by the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which is insignificant in a context of 0 Hz to infinite Hz. The anomalous heating exhibited by the Hutchison Effect shows plainly that we have much to learn, especially where thermodynamics and electromagnetism meet.

The spontaneous fracturing of metals, as occurs with the Hutchison Effect, is unique for two reasons: (1) there is no evidence of an "external force" causing the fracturing, and (2) the method by which the metal separates involves a sliding motion in a sideways direction, horizontally. The metal simply comes apart.

Some temporary changes in the crystalline structure and physical properties of metals are somewhat reminiscent of the "spoon bending" of Uri Geller, except that there is no one near the metal samples when the changes take place. One video shows a spoon flapping up and down like a limp rag in a stiff breeze. In the case of permanent changes, a metal bar will be hard at one end, like steel, and soft at the other end, like powdered lead. Again, this is evidence of strong influence on Van der Waals forces.

The radio wave interferences involved in producing these effects are produced from as many as four and five different radio sources, all operating at low power. However, the zone in which the interferences take place is stressed by hundreds of kilovolts.

It is surmised by some researchers that what Hutchison has done is tap into the Zero Point Energy. This energy gets its name from the fact that it is evidenced by oscillations at zero degrees Kelvin, where supposedly all activity in an atom ceases. The energy is associated with the spontaneous emission and annihilation of electrons and positrons coming from what is called "the quantum vacuum." The density of the energy contained in the quantum vacuum is estimated by some at ten to the thirteenth Joules per cubic centimeter, which is reportedly sufficient to boil off the Earth's oceans in a matter of moments.

Given access to such energies, it is small wonder that the Hutchison Effect produces such bizarre phenomena. At the present time, the phenomena are difficult to reproduce with any regularity. The focus for the future, then, is first to increase the frequency of occurence of the effects, then to achieve some degree of precision in their control.

Shreveport, Louisiana
February 16, 1999
Mark A. Solis

Thanks for studying this important information if you do,

Abraham Hafiz Rodriguez
M4 Medical Student
B.S. Biology/Neurobiology

SOURCE:
https://m.facebook.com/drjudywood/photos/a.108769095854392.12444.108768449187790/451235164941115/?type=1&source=48


PJ Darling
Posted 29 May 2014 at 05:09 am

ballaerina said: "As an observer, that looks pretty BS to me. But hey, I'm not a scientist."

Neither is he :)


PJ Darling
Posted 29 May 2014 at 05:16 am

Marius said: "If this really is 'anti-gravity' why would the objects go up? I would imagine that an object, suddenly released from the bonds of gravity, would start moving in a straight line relative to the spin of the Earth, yes?"

.Good point, it wouldn't do anything unless acted on by some force.


Katie
Posted 13 June 2014 at 06:51 am

Who's to say that this is fiction or not? Just because this man doesn't have a PHD in science or anything, doesn't make him a crock... there are many extremely intelligent people out there that have created many things in this world... We are being misled by our Government, because of course they don't want us to know the truth.... I totally believe that there are so many weapons of mass destruction.... such as a Death Ray... how can we explain so many things with 9/11, and the plane that just seemed to have vanished just recently...Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.. Still a mystery....
.


John
Posted 30 June 2014 at 08:23 am

The footage is also available online now.. it has been some years since this article has been written. The link to see what is new these days is right here,
http://www.hutchisoneffect.ca/Videos.php
Thanks for all your interest and continued support over the years!
The new site is http://www.hutchisoneffect.ca since 2007


Ankit
Posted 11 September 2014 at 11:31 am

In my opinion such an article has no place on DI. After reading so many great articles, this has been a let down.


deceptionexposed
Posted 26 October 2014 at 01:49 pm

I think the video below with the fishing line needs to be posted here because I don't see it on the hutchison website as a fav. The line can be seen in the top left quadrant of the screen maneuvering the "moving" object:{}

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6GkmSwt7zI


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