Sorry to interrupt...this will only take a moment.
This site is an independent reader-supported project.
Because you have viewed at least a few articles now...
Can you give a small donation to keep us online?
We can give you e-books and audiobooks and stuff.
This site is an independent reader-supported project.
The cost of keeping it running are considerable.
If you can spare a few dollars it would help us enormously.
We can give you e-books and audiobooks and stuff.
×
×
Experimental Feature

Select 'Atmospheric Audio' from the Audio menu to add subtle background audio to certain portions of the article.

The Unfortunate Sex Life of the Banana

Article #331 • Written by Matt Castle

The humble banana almost seems like a miracle of nature. Colourful, nutritious, and much cherished by children, monkeys and clowns, it has a favoured position in the planet’s fruitbowls. The banana is vitally important in many regions of the tropics, where different parts of the plant are used for clothing, paper and tableware, and where the fruit itself is an essential dietary staple. People across the globe appreciate the soft, nourishing flesh, the snack-sized portions, and the easy-peel covering that conveniently changes colour to indicate ripeness. Individual fruit—or fingers—sit comfortably in the human hand, readily detached from their close-packed companions. Indeed, the banana appears almost purpose-designed for efficient human consumption and distribution. It is difficult to conceive of a more fortuitous fruit.

The banana, however, is a freakish and fragile genetic mutant; one that has survived through the centuries due to the sustained application of selective breeding by diligent humans. Indeed, the "miraculous" banana is far from being a no-strings-attached gift from nature. Its cheerful appearance hides a fatal flaw— one that threatens its proud place in the grocery basket. The banana’s problem can be summed up in a single word: sex.

The banana plant is a hybrid, originating from the mismatched pairing of two South Asian wild plant species: Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Between these two products of nature, the former produces unpalatable fruit flesh, and the latter is far too seedy for enjoyable consumption. Nonetheless, these closely related plants occasionally cross-pollinate and spawn seedlings which grow into sterile, half-breed banana plants. Some ten thousand years ago, early human experimenters noted that some of these hybridized Musa bore unexpectedly tasty, seedless fruit with an unheard-of yellowness and inexplicably amusing shape. They also proved an excellent source of carbohydrates and other important nutrients.

A seed-packed wild musa (banana)
A seed-packed wild musa (banana)

Despite the hybrid’s unfortunate sexual impotence, shrewd would-be agriculturalists realised that the plants could be cultivated from suckering shoots and cuttings taken from the underground stem. The genetically identical progeny produced this way remained sterile, yet the new plant could be widely propagated with human help. An intensive and prolonged process of selective breeding—aided by the variety of hybrids and occasional random genetic mutations—eventually evolved the banana into its present familiar form. Arab traders carried these new wonderfruit to Africa, and Spanish conquistadors relayed them onwards to the Americas. Thus the tasty new banana was spared from an otherwise unavoidable evolutionary dead-end.

Today, bananas and their close relatives, the starchy plantains, grow in a number of different varieties or cultivars. Among temperate palates, the most familiar is the Cavendish, a shapely and sweet-tasting dessert banana. This is the banana found in the supermarkets, splits, and milkshakes of the developed world. It is exported on an industrial scale from commercial plantations in the tropics. Every Cavendish is genetically identical, possessing the same pleasant taste (which is somewhat lacking in more subtle flavours according to banana aficionados). They also all share the same potential for yellow curvaceousness and the same susceptibility to disease.

Although there are numerous other banana and plantain varieties cultivated for local consumption in Africa and Asia, none has the same worldwide appeal as the Cavendish. While these other varieties display more genetic variability, all come from the same sterile Musa hybrids which so delighted our forebears thousands of years ago. Likewise none of them have enjoyed the benefits of the frenzied gene-shuffling facilitated by sexual congress.

Stuck with the clunky, inefficient cloning of asexual reproduction, the sterile banana is at a serious disadvantage in the never-ending biological arms race between plant and pest. Indeed, it is a well-established fact that bananas are particularly prone to crop-consuming insects and diseases. A severe outbreak of banana disease could easily spread through the genetically uniform plantations, devastating economies and depriving our fruitbowls. Varieties grown for local consumption would also suffer, potentially causing mass starvation in tropical regions.

Banana bunches in protective isolation.
Banana bunches in protective isolation.

This scenario may seem preposterous, but researchers all over the world are earnestly exploring the possibility. The custodians of the beloved banana are all too aware of the potential for a banana apocalypse— because it has already happened in the fruit’s past. And the next time could be much worse.

Until the middle of the twentieth century, most bananas on sale in the developed world belonged to the Gros Michel cultivar. These bananas were sweet and tasty and didn’t spoil too quickly, making them eminently suitable for commercial export. Old-timers contend that in flavour and convenience, the Gros Michel outshone even the current top-banana, the Cavendish. Yet from the early twentieth century, large plantations of ‘Big Mike’ proved increasingly fertile ground for a fungal leaf affliction known as Panama disease. Affected crops would soon deteriorate into rotting piles of unprofitable vegetation. As the century progressed, commercial growers found themselves in a desperate race against time, making doomed attempts to establish new plantations in disease-free areas of rainforest before the fungus arrived.

In the 1950s the Vietnamese Cavendish came to the rescue. Banana companies delayed switching from Big Mike for as long as possible due to the necessary changes in growing, storage, and ripening infrastructure, and many producers teetered on the edge of bankruptcy. As Big Mike started pushing up daisies, banana plantations frantically reconfigured, and by the mid 1960s the changeover was largely complete. The distinct—and now extinct—taste of Big Mike was quickly lost to the fickle public memory. Cavendish was king.

It has done a sterling job in the intervening years, yet now the Cavendish is starting to struggle in its own contest against contagion. In the 1970s a disease named Black Sigatoka was beaten back with enthusiastic applications of pesticide, but more recently a new strain of the original bane of the banana has threatened the plantations. Since 1992 a vigorous, pesticide-tolerant strain of Panama disease has been wiping out bananas—including previously resistant crops of Cavendish—in Southeast Asia. It has yet to reach the large commercial plantations in Latin America, but most banana-watchers believe that this is only a matter of time.

A navel orange and its underdeveloped siamese twin
A navel orange and its underdeveloped siamese twin

Opinions differ on how long the Cavendish can survive the new onslaught, and on the best way to tackle the threat. This time, unfortunately, there is no obvious back-up variety waiting in the wings. So far, banana science has provided scant few approaches for improving disease resistance. One method involves the traditional techniques of selective breeding: although banana plants are clones, very occasionally they can be persuaded to produce seeds through a painstaking process of hand pollination. Only one fruit in three hundred will produce a seed, and of these seeds only one in three will have the correct chromosomal configuration to allow germination. The seeds are laboriously extracted by straining tons of mashed fruit through fine meshes. Research stations in commercial banana growing countries, such as Honduras, engage large squads of banana sex workers for such tasks, and to screen the new plant varieties for favourable characteristics.

Another fruit subject to such human-assisted reproduction is the ubiquitous navel orange. It, too, was the result of a serendipitous mutation, this one from an orange tree in Brazil in the mid-1800s. Each orange on this particular tree was found to have a tiny, underdeveloped twin sharing its skin, causing a navel-like formation opposite the stem. These strange siamese citruses were much sweeter than the fruit of their parent trees, and delightfully seedless. Since the new tree was unable to reproduce naturally, caretakers amputated some of its limbs and grafted them onto other citrus trees to produce more of the desirable fruit. Even today navel oranges are produced through such botanical surgery, and all of the navel oranges everywhere are direct descendants—essentially genetic clones—of those from that original tree.

As for the Cavendish, its last best hope may lie in genetic modification (GM). The University of Leuven in Belgium is a world centre in banana research due to its colonial connections with Africa. Belgian banana scientists have become skilled in using DNA-transfer to introduce disease-resistance genes directly into the plant’s genome. These less labour-intensive methods promise a way to develop stronger, fitter, happier and more productive bananas.

"Fruity Flash" by José Mª Andrés Martín. <a href='http://www.alzhem.com/'>Prints available</a>.
"Fruity Flash" by José Mª Andrés Martín. Prints available.

In 2007, Ugandan field trials of the first Leuven uber-banana were announced, although public distaste of the idea of GM foods may impede its long term success. And in Honduras, researchers have developed a banana cultivar named ‘Goldfinger’ through traditional selective breeding methods. Although it has enjoyed some public acceptance in Australia, it suffers from the drawbacks of a distinctly different, non-Cavendish flavour, and a longer maturation time. If nothing else, these advances offer hope that science will one day overcome the unfortunate sexual inadequacies of the banana. Let us hope so, otherwise the resulting bananageddon will ensure that the Cavendish goes the way of Big Mike, and future generations of fruit lovers will have to find some other curved yellow food to complement their ice cream.

Article written by Matt Castle, published on 24 August 2009. Matt is a writer and contributing editor for Damn Interesting, and not quite an anagram of 'Clam Taste'.

Article design and artwork by Alan Bellows. Edited by Alan Bellows.
SHARE

More Information
Related Articles


511 Comments
iain010100
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:01 am

Is this where we suggest banana jokes?


tomjhutch
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:05 am

1st! Oooh yeah.


Garamond
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:13 am

2nd. And DI!


gerwitz
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:15 am

This certainly explains why organic bananas are rare and expensive.

If Cavendish failed today, what would take its place?


tomjhutch
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:15 am

DI


DWfromLA
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:27 am

I remember being taught in Biology, ages ago, that the banana was triploid, i.e. three sides. Freak of nature it certainly is, but yummy as in banana cream pie!!


Pistol
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:44 am

Ohhh if only I had realized I had just happened upon a fresh article I could have posted first before the chance had spoiled. Ohh well, DI article. I'm surprised they cannot genetically modify the species to be resistant to common blights. Are the plants that gave rise to the banana as susceptible to the same diseases?


Pistol
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:45 am

ohh yeah,

mmmmmmm pie.


Pluto
Posted 24 August 2009 at 11:51 am

Well that certainly blows one creationist's argument away.


Didiydi
Posted 24 August 2009 at 12:06 pm

Did I understand right that all commercial bananas today (except organic) are in fact genetically modified? As in GM corn, soy etc, stuff that we're suppose to avoid because it has no DNA and some say no aura and are therefore most probably harmful for our health. If so, why there isn't a widespread anti GM movement against bananas as there is against those other crops? Also, since it heavily depends on pesticides to survive, does anyone know how safe it is to eat it compared to other conventionally grown fruits?


Ard Ri
Posted 24 August 2009 at 12:11 pm

#10 Nice!


Flammadeao
Posted 24 August 2009 at 12:22 pm

Pluto said: "Well that certainly blows one creationist’s argument away."

Now all we need is something to tackle Peanut Butter, but that one's much harder to argue against of course.


VR_Don
Posted 24 August 2009 at 12:53 pm

Damn Ironic.


jimthesane
Posted 24 August 2009 at 12:59 pm

Now all we need is something to tackle Peanut Butter, but that one’s much harder to argue against of course."

What would Elvis eat without peanut butter and banana sandwiches? Today’s music would be completely different without his inspiration, and if he had no bananas and peanut butter to eat he would have died years ago of starvation instead of being alive today……..


neill1973
Posted 24 August 2009 at 12:59 pm

Great article Damn Interesting as always. That last picture really made me laugh.


casaba
Posted 24 August 2009 at 01:04 pm

"large squads of banana sex workers"

Thanks for that one. And the rest of it was a fun read. Lucky for us DI strikes again.


Ava
Posted 24 August 2009 at 01:16 pm

I couldn't imaging a world without bananas...


dRAEMtYGER
Posted 24 August 2009 at 01:40 pm

I remember reading/hearing that the Gros Michel is not extinct. That it is grown in greenhouses and controlled environments they can keep disease-free. Could not find where I read/heard that but Wikipedia links to an article that talks about how they are using Gros Michel to create a disease resistant banana.


StillAliveAndWell
Posted 24 August 2009 at 01:59 pm

Damn Interesting, Indeed! Any article with "sex" and "banana" in the title is bound to arouse interest in any reader! I never realized that the current banana supply was in any danger of being wiped out by disease, fungus. or parasites, but now I have a better appreciation for what is "the perfect fruit".
Which brings up another topic that I was thinking about while grocery shopping recently. How lucky we are in developed countries to be able to walk into a supermarket and have an abundance of fresh fruit to purchase. And, not only do we have 12 different varieties of apples to choose from, but we get to pick through the pile to find the best looking ones to take home. Then, 2 weeks later when we haven't eaten them (but they looked so good in the store - I really meant to eat 'em), we throw them away before the fruit flies take over the household...


arturo
Posted 24 August 2009 at 02:03 pm

I must admit to a deep dark secret - I have eaten a banana practically every day for at least the last 20 years. And what they say is true; after tasting some other varieties, I learned the one the American public gets is very bland compared to others. It is the same situation we have with apples - eating only Red Delicious and missing out on any real apple taste, or with beer - drinking only Bud Light and thinking you have experienced the taste of beer. We have even tried to ruin chocolate by making it extra sweet, & adding milk and sugar. Then there is that abomination named "white chocolate" which has absolutely nothing in common with chocolate. I know the Mayans desribe their heaven as forever sitting under a tree and drinking chocolate; for my part I think we could add eating bananas to that.....and peanut butter......and drinking beer.....and, oh yeah, eating pie!


tunapez
Posted 24 August 2009 at 02:09 pm

DI and damn amusing. Bananageddon... FUD for the whole family!

PS: Thanx for the book, best damn $14 I've spent in years.


Tink
Posted 24 August 2009 at 02:21 pm

Thanks Matt for a fresh read, It's great to see you back! Oh what a naughty mind you have, LOL.
Waaay back many moons ago, when DI! was just a two month old baby website, Jason Bellows posted an article about the praying Mantis. ( Mighty Mantes Written by Jason Bellows on 29 October 2005 )
There was a link to some neat buggy photos. Exploring that link I found a whole series of beautiful pictures showing the blooming and growth of a bunch of bananas.. Check it out, these are very pretty, and I had no idea that bananas grew up-side down.
http://www.kleptography.com/gallery-bananagrove.htm


Tink
Posted 24 August 2009 at 02:26 pm

Oops! How rude of me to not post the link to Jason's article. Here tis with my appologies!:
http://www.damninteresting.com/mighty-mantes


Silverhill
Posted 24 August 2009 at 03:43 pm

DWfromLA said: "I remember being taught in Biology, ages ago, that the banana was triploid, i.e. three sides."
Triploid does not mean trihedral...it means "having a chromosome number that is three times the basic or haploid number". For more info, see (for instance) the "Ployploidy in plants" section of the Wikipedia atricle on polyploidy. (Bananas, in my experience, are more nearly tetrahedral...)

Didiydi said: "Did I understand right that all commercial bananas today (except organic) are in fact genetically modified? As in GM corn, soy etc, stuff that we’re suppose to avoid because it has no DNA..."
Every living thing has DNA, even the sterile bananas. "GM" means "genetically modified", not "genetically zeroed". There are those who avoid, even fear, GM foods because of vague ideas along the lines of "we don't really know what's in there...whether they'll even be safe to eat, etc."
Genetic modification (at the level of direct DNA manipulation) should be used with intelligent caution, yes, but bear in mind that humans have already been effecting GM plants (and animals) for thousands of years --- via selective breeding.


Fishrock
Posted 24 August 2009 at 03:43 pm

Thanks, Matt, both for new DI content (don't call it a comeback...) and for opening my eyes to something new to worry about, and something new to connoisse. In my family, we go through 3-5 Cavendishes a day.

DWfromLA said: "I remember being taught in Biology, ages ago, that the banana was triploid, i.e. three sides. "

But their sides are kind of rounded, so they can't be fully triploid. Perhaps they just have multiple trisomies to account for the bulges!


Silverhill
Posted 24 August 2009 at 03:48 pm

Unto Mr. Castle:
Good stuff, sir! I had heard some of these things in a radio news article, but your article adds nicely to that.

[nitpick mode]
There are three small errors I wish to bring to your attention...

"It is difficult to conceive of a more fortuitous fruit.
"Fortuitous" means "accidental", not "fortunate".
And in the Honduras, researchers have developed...

"the Honduras" --> "Honduras"
...some other curved yellow food to compliment their ice cream.
"Compliment" means "to bestow praise"; "complement" means "to fill out, to complete".

Now returning you to your (ir)regularly scheduled DI writing... :-)
[/nitpick mode]


jarvisloop
Posted 24 August 2009 at 05:55 pm

Mr. Castle:

Congratulations! I have read quite a bit about the various types of bananas, but I had not found all of the information that you have written here. Thanks.

Fellow DIers: You might find this to be of interest: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_a_banana_a_berry

Final comment (my usual): The book is great. Keep this site alive: Buy the book, and thanks to those who have.


Slate Grey
Posted 24 August 2009 at 07:11 pm

Wow. I had no idea the banana (and the navel orange) had such an interesting past.

dRAEMtYGER, I hope you're right about the Big Mike. I'd love to try one some day, and it would be a shame if it were lost forever.

Great read Castle. Thanks for the brain food.


Adam Martin
Posted 24 August 2009 at 08:42 pm

We cannot allow a banana gap!


Chris
Posted 24 August 2009 at 08:50 pm

Varieties? Vine ripened? And proclaimed rather bland? We in the Midwest are deprived of a taste others take for granted.


Andrew Wade
Posted 24 August 2009 at 09:49 pm

Silverhill - Actually, both definitions of fortuitous (accidental & lucky) are apparently acceptable and well-known: http://thesaurus.reference.com/browse/fortuitous?jss=0

Although I confess that the 'accidental' version is new to me. Might be a regional difference.


Eduardo
Posted 25 August 2009 at 12:26 am

In the 1970s a disease named Black Sigatoka was beaten back with enthusiastic applications of pesticide, but more recently a new strain of the original bane of the banana has threatened the plantations.

Pardon my possible ignorance, but shouldn't this be herbicide?


Matt Castle
Posted 25 August 2009 at 12:39 am

Silverhill #26
Glad you enjoyed the article. I believe that 'fortuitous' is generally accepted as 'fortunately accidental' in modern usage. Guilty as charged on your other hawk-eyed nitpicks, though-- edits should be forthcoming.

Eduardo #32
'Fungicide' would be the most accurate term to use here. 'Pesticide' covers it though.


Mirage_GSM
Posted 25 August 2009 at 02:19 am

This article was already DI when I read the unfinished version a few weeks ago, and it is even more so now. Please continue to supply us with such high quality articles, even if you have to take your time to do so!

Did I understand right that all commercial bananas today (except organic) are in fact genetically modified? As in GM corn, soy etc, stuff that we’re suppose to avoid because it has no DNA and some say no aura and are therefore most probably harmful for our health.

Adding to what Silverhill already answered, currently most Bananas are not genetically modified in the sense that anti-GM-activists are concerned about.
According to the article they are "cloned" from a parent plant, a process used for many other plant species like grapes or potatoes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloning#Horticultural
Selective breeding is also a form of GM, though (if not used on humans) it is generally not considered unethical.
What is usually meant when talking about GM is direct manipulation of an organism's DNA, and so far this process is not widely used in Bananas.
As to the dangers to one's health while consuming GM-food, I am not really concerned about that. GM-food has been a regular part of our diet for some time now, and so far no obvious problems have surfaced.
What I am concerned about is the effects that GM-crops can have upon the natural flora in the areas where it is cultivated. GM-crops are engineered to be superior to natural crops so, if they are allowed to propagate into the wild they could crowd out other vegetation like what happened with Caulerpa Taxifolia.
http://www.damninteresting.com/mutant-killer-seaweed-of-doom


symmetry
Posted 25 August 2009 at 04:11 am

A great article, thankyou.


symmetry
Posted 25 August 2009 at 04:38 am

I can't wait for the book to be released here in the UK, Amazon says 1st of October.


fvngvs
Posted 25 August 2009 at 05:42 am

Matt Castle said: "
‘Fungicide’ would be the most accurate term to use here. ‘Pesticide’ covers it though."

It's all a lie, I tell you. I never had anything to do with Big Mike.

It will be a sad day to see the last of the banana, but: a triploid genome? A sterile, cloned monoculture? Sorry folks, but I think it's doomed (sob!)
(makes another banana milkshake before it's too late.)


Rodger Wrighthead
Posted 25 August 2009 at 06:02 am

DI.

I have two question though: Does Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana (or variants) still exist today and if so can you still cross pollinate them (I would presume you could otherwise the Latin names would have changed somewhat more extremely)?

Where I am going with this is that these two strains could have remained genetically diverse enough (due to their sexual reproduction) to withstand the Panama and Bananageddon scenarios. This could make it plausible that every so often you could cross-pollinate and repopulate the banana plantations to naturally "update" their genetics.

I realize that as far as getting the right taste and resistance there would be a lot of research and trial&error (phenotype/genotypes being what they are and all) and that re plantation would be costly but surely this could be one way the banana plantations could immediately slow the effects of full blown bananagedon while buying some time for geneticists to create a GM "super" banana?

Anyway, food for though.
I personally hope that it will be PBJ Time for a little while more and that that ring ring ringing could possibly be coming from a Banana phone...


adastra
Posted 25 August 2009 at 08:32 am

I remember reading somewhere, sometime, that women in Hawaii used to be (long ago) prohibited, under pain of death, from touching bananas because of the magical phallic resemblance. I wonder if that is true or just a good story.


adastra
Posted 25 August 2009 at 08:39 am

It appears that what I read before is true. An interesting link:

http://www.coffeetimes.com/banana.htm


oldmancoyote
Posted 25 August 2009 at 08:58 am

Someone needs to get on top of the problem. NOW! Life without banana bread would totally suck. Where is the government intervention? Where is the public outcry? We must do something.


Virgil Syonid
Posted 25 August 2009 at 10:18 am

"As for the Cavendish, its last best hope may lie in genetic modification (GM). The University of Leuven in Belgium is a world centre in banana research due to its colonial connections with Africa. Belgian banana scientists have become skilled in using DNA-transfer to introduce disease-resistance genes directly into the plant’s genome."

You get this year's award for 'most blatant non-sequitur'. Banana eugenics has brought us to the brink of a bananapocalypse and yet the fruit's 'last best hope' lies in GMOs--eugenics on steroids--which have so far proven to be a far less predictable and far more destructive trial-and-error science?

IMHO, we should quit while we still have viable musa and (reasonably) pesticide-free bananas.


fizban7
Posted 25 August 2009 at 10:29 am

I love this article and the further reading links!

I grew up in Hawaii(the big island) And some point about 10 years ago there was a banana virus outbreak that I as a kid thought was stupid. The quarentined off the town of Kailua-Kona, and sytematically killed every banana plant!(Planticide? Herbicide? Floracide? i dunno.)

I dont remember if it was the cavendish variety though. I cant eat that supermarket variety here in seattle. It is NOT THE SAME. I'm not an afficianato or anything, but our supermarket had APPLE BANANAS once and they are much more delicious than the cavendish. My dads apple bananas are seriously like eating candy when it is just ripe. People who've only ever had supermarket variety's cannot imagine it. (similarly I hated apples before I moved to Washington)

Also, I only eat bananas with a little bit of brown on them. any green, and it is too ripe. I know way to many people who like unripe, pale tasting bananas and they think I'm weird because I don't like bananas yet grew up in Hawaii. You gotta eat local produce. It just tastes better.

A good story about brown bananas. Most people throw them away when they have a few spots on them. DONT! They are perfectly fine. It turn out that people are more selective about texture than flavor. I dont care however. When they get brown and soft, they get must more sweet. A friend of mine was hanging out with a buddy and his little kid, and they had a brown banana laying around. Not spotted, but pure brown. He peeled some back, and pantomimed eating a bite. He then offired it to the little kid who of course refused. "but that's a bad banana!" "No, not this one" he replied " This one is a Chocolate banana!" "Oh... ok!" and the kid ate the whole thing smiling. Brown bananas look gross, but taste just as sweet.


oldmancoyote
Posted 25 August 2009 at 02:23 pm

fizban, that nice brown state a banana reaches is not time to throw them out. That's the perfect state banananananas (I can never remember how many ana's they get) need to be in for banananana bread.
I think you're right, though. The texture plays a big part for a lot of people.


DWfromLA
Posted 25 August 2009 at 03:09 pm

Fishrock said: "Thanks, Matt, both for new DI content (don’t call it a comeback…) and for opening my eyes to something new to worry about, and something new to connoisse. In my family, we go through 3-5 Cavendishes a day.

DWfromLA said: “I remember being taught in Biology, ages ago, that the banana was triploid, i.e. three sides. “
But their sides are kind of rounded, so they can’t be fully triploid. Perhaps they just have multiple trisomies to account for the bulges!"

Hiya,
If one cuts a banana and note the inner bits there are three sides unlike an apple or for the most part, any other organic thing. ach well, it's banana smoothie time


Evil Twin
Posted 25 August 2009 at 03:10 pm

Sex, bananas, naval oranges...what would Freud say!


Obfuscatory Transparency
Posted 25 August 2009 at 03:22 pm

NUTS!


I dot S
Posted 25 August 2009 at 05:30 pm

Brilliant article!!


one_plaid_day
Posted 25 August 2009 at 07:51 pm

Good Job!
The best bananas I have ever were on the South Atlantic island of St. Helena. They grow at least 6 different varieties (some locals say the best are grown by Cyril, the proprietor of the "Cyril's Snack Stand in Jamestown).

Thanks for another new article!


oldmancoyote
Posted 25 August 2009 at 10:25 pm

MMMMM... Banana cream pie..............


Mirage_GSM
Posted 26 August 2009 at 01:28 am

Banana eugenics has brought us to the brink of a bananapocalypse and yet the fruit’s ‘last best hope’ lies in GMOs–eugenics on steroids–which have so far proven to be a far less predictable and far more destructive trial-and-error science?

I’d say that “banana eugenics” is what enabled us to enjoy bananas today in the first place…


doofbanman
Posted 26 August 2009 at 11:36 am

yay for Radiohead references!


darren.l
Posted 26 August 2009 at 02:41 pm

DI ... it is sooooo good that you are back.
...more ... please!


GeorgeAR
Posted 26 August 2009 at 05:03 pm

DI is back as the Top Bananna! Remember, just because you can't reproduce doesn't mean you can't have sex...


Ilaeria
Posted 26 August 2009 at 07:48 pm

I recently discovered that I have been peeling my bananas from the wrong end. You should peel from the end opposite the stalk, which is the top when they're growing on a banana plant but is traditionally considered the bottom. It's much easier to peel from that end, you pinch off the little black bit that no-one likes to eat, and the remaining end pops easily out of the skin when you eat down that far. It's also how monkeys do it, and monkeys are the experts in bananas!


Virgil Syonid
Posted 27 August 2009 at 12:58 am

I’d say that “banana eugenics” is what enabled us to enjoy bananas today in the first place…"

True, but at least good ol' fashioned eugenics didn't have nasty side-effects. Or built-in carcinogens. The farmers also had the advantage of experimenting, testing, and validating over several generations (rather than six months).

Regardless, an article describing how eugenics is responsible for the coming bananapocalypse isn't the greatest endorsement for GMOs.

And who knows. Maybe those seeded musa are darn tasty. A whole industry (with a lifetime of more than a few generations) could've sprung up if not for the shiny yellow 'insta-musa' with built-in tab that seduced us all. ;)


Mostly Harmless
Posted 27 August 2009 at 06:47 am

Definitiely DI. I'd heard a bit about bananas being clones before... but navel oranges too!

I just ate a navel orange for desert. Felt weird, now that I knew that it was 100 years old. :P


cinndave
Posted 27 August 2009 at 06:57 am

Poster #9 beat me to it. It's true creationists have pointed to the banana as being designed by God just for us.

I learned from Bill Nye's educational show that sexual reproduction came about for the purpose of accelerating genetic diversity so we can stay ahead of parasites and diseases.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELahVSsrmA8

What I really wonder is how we organisms made that change from asexual to sexual reproduction.


Mirage_GSM
Posted 27 August 2009 at 09:01 am

Virgil Syonid said: "True, but at least good ol’ fashioned eugenics didn’t have nasty side-effects. Or built-in carcinogens."

I seriously doubt anyone would build-in carcinogens into GM-food either ;-)
"Regardless, an article describing how eugenics is responsible for the coming bananapocalypse isn’t the greatest endorsement for GMOs."

Interesting... Where exactly does this article describe how eugenics is responsible for the possible impending extinction of the banana?
What puts the banana in peril is its own sterility. Without human assisance it would have gone the way of the Dodo long ago.


Fishrock
Posted 27 August 2009 at 12:02 pm

"Old-fashioned eugenics"? This just reminds me of forced sterilization of the disabled, euthanasia, and ultimately nazism (apologies to M. Godwin).

VMfrom LA: the pattern of 3 sides inside the fruit is a sign that bananas are monocot plants. You're right that few other tree fruits have this pattern, because trees are dicot plants, and banana plants, though tall, aren't true trees.


Fishrock
Posted 27 August 2009 at 12:33 pm

Flowering trees are dicots, that is. Not redwoods & ginkgos & cycads.


sh0cktopus
Posted 27 August 2009 at 05:34 pm

Anagrams for "Matt Castle" that include all letters:

Cattle Mast
Lamest Tact
Scam Tattle

Hmmm... not much improvement over "Clam Taste."


Skydive
Posted 28 August 2009 at 03:42 am

Goldfinger Bananas are great tasting. Suprised they aren't more widely eaten


boxed
Posted 31 August 2009 at 06:43 am

@Virgil:
"GMOs–eugenics on steroids–which have so far proven to be a far less predictable and far more destructive trial-and-error science?"

Genetic Modified Foods have so far had no significant destructive effect. It is very much in the early stages so yea it's trial and error, but what's bad with that?

"True, but at least good ol’ fashioned eugenics didn’t have nasty side-effects. Or built-in carcinogens"

You seriously mean that the holocaust didn't have any nasty side effects? How could killing off a sizable percentage of the top intellectuals of the world NOT have nasty side effects? As for carcinogens, you need to stop listening to the propaganda from the anti GM-fundamentalists. Creating a carcinogen from scratch via genetic engineering is extremely hard/unlikely. Creating _cancer_ in the species you are hacking around with, however, is quite easy. But as you should've learnt from school cancer is not a communicative disease (and if a GE introduces cancer in a plant he'd just destroy that plant and start over anyway).


Didiydi
Posted 31 August 2009 at 03:42 pm

Silverhill said: ”Every living thing has DNA, even the sterile bananas. “GM” means “genetically modified”, not “genetically zeroed”. There are those who avoid, even fear, GM foods because of vague ideas along the lines of “we don’t really know what’s in there…whether they’ll even be safe to eat, etc.”
Genetic modification (at the level of direct DNA manipulation) should be used with intelligent caution, yes, but bear in mind that humans have already been effecting GM plants (and animals) for thousands of years — via selective breeding."

Thanks, I heard David Wolfe mentioning no DNA in GM foods. However, I wouldn't equate changing the DNA through selective breeding with mixing the plants with herbicides so they don't have to be sprayed, and resulting in plants that don't reproduce. They don't mention herbicides here, but I wonder what it means "disease resistance gene" and if/how it affects our body.


Didiydi
Posted 31 August 2009 at 04:07 pm

Mirage_GSM said: What is usually meant when talking about GM is direct manipulation of an organism’s DNA, and so far this process is not widely used in Bananas.
As to the dangers to one’s health while consuming GM-food, I am not really concerned about that. GM-food has been a regular part of our diet for some time now, and so far no obvious problems have surfaced.
What I am concerned about is the effects that GM-crops can have upon the natural flora in the areas where it is cultivated. GM-crops are engineered to be superior to natural crops so, if they are allowed to propagate into the wild they could crowd out other vegetation like what happened with Caulerpa Taxifolia.
http://www.damninteresting.com/mutant-killer-seaweed-of-doo"

Well, not widely used as in not at all, or there are some commercial ones that are, in which case I certainly can't tell from looking at the banana :)?
No obvious problems? And the prevalence of cancer, diabetes, obesity and so on comes from.....watching too much TV. Or maybe from the lack of nutrients in our diet? GM, irradiated, heavy metal contaminated, nutrients depleted foods. I am amazed how many people still trust in 'scientists' and 'scientific research'. We still haven't figured out the system that will teach each particular person what/how to eat to achieve optimal health- the basics. That should make us think what DO they know? Or how much we are not being told.
Not only do GM crops crowd out other plants, they mix with the original crops and form mutants that by and by eradicate the real crops, such as corn in Mexico for ex. But then that's another story...


crackerLeroy
Posted 31 August 2009 at 09:24 pm

I, for one, revile the banana and all flavours thereof, foreign and domestic, and bid it a disrespectful and dismissive farewell. May your nauseating scent and mealy pablum-like texture forever be consigned to the mulch heap of history. I revel in your impending doom, banana bread! I joyously dance in the new day, freed from the formerly looming shadow of your supply chain, freed from the millions of dollars of Dole protection monies paid to bloodthirsty cartels! Freed from your vile puerile stench that coats babies' and comely co-ed's breath.
All hail your likely successor, kumquat. ( or some such other awkwardly named fruit). Truly a proud day for me, i get to make my first post amongst such esteemed minds and do so while cock-punching a self-immolating fruit.
Next week: Joys of hobbling ailing pensioners
Gosh, now i dont even have the heart to address the preceeding treasure trove packaged so neatly in elipses. I can only hope 66 will provide an insightful look into the mutagenic markers of manipulated maize?


Mirage_GSM
Posted 01 September 2009 at 03:36 pm

Didiydi said: "Well, not widely used as in not at all, or there are some commercial ones that are, in which case I certainly can’t tell from looking at the banana :)?

Not in commercial ones, but according to the article, there is some experimentation under way, so "not at all" would not be correct.
No obvious problems? And the prevalence of cancer, diabetes, obesity and so on comes from…..watching too much TV. Or maybe from the lack of nutrients in our diet? GM, irradiated, heavy metal contaminated, nutrients depleted foods. "

Well, people in third world countries probably eat GM corn and other GM foodstuffs just like we do, but you don't see that many of them with obesity or diabetes problems... Actually watching too much TV or eating McDonalds 4 times a week seem to be much more likely candidates to cause them.
And depending on who you listen to, just about everything causes cancer...
I have yet to see any serious, scientifically based study linking cancer to GM foods. In fact "A 2008 review published by the Royal Society of Medicine noted that GM foods have been eaten by millions of people worldwide for over 15 years, with no reports of ill effects. Similarly a 2004 report from the US National Academies of Sciences stated: "To date, no adverse health effects attributed to genetic engineering have been documented in the human population."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_food_controversy
Since there are multiple NGOs actively trying to prove the health hazard of GM food, and none of them has to date been able to do so, I feel absolutely safe consuming them, so long as current regulatory standards are kept.


Gemfyre
Posted 02 September 2009 at 07:08 am

A world with no bananas would indeed suck (not for my b/f though, he hates the things). Lucky I have already had practice. When Cyclone Larry wiped out most of the Queensland banana crop in 2006 they rose from a usual $3/4 a kilo to a whopping $12 a kilo. So I stopped eating nanners for a while.

Then we visited Malaysia that same year. A bunch of Lady Finger bananas was 30 ringgit, which equalled about 1 Aussie dollar. I gorged myself on bananas (and various other tropical fruits) while I was there.


Denvergal
Posted 02 September 2009 at 10:13 am

DI indeed! I would crushed if I couldn't eat delicious bananas. Luckily, my husbad works as a tropical horticulturist for a Botanic Gardens, and they grow all sorts of varieties of bananas....well beyond cavendish. Talk about literally getting to eat the fruits of his labor!


Wing-nut
Posted 02 September 2009 at 11:28 am

DI indeed. I will never look at another banana the same way again after seeing that cartoon at the end.


Didiydi
Posted 05 September 2009 at 03:29 am

Mirage_GSM said: "Since there are multiple NGOs actively trying to prove the health hazard of GM food, and none of them has to date been able to do so, I feel absolutely safe consuming them, so long as current regulatory standards are kept."

I've been focussing on "creating your reality" thing lately, so I guess that would mean that as long as you believe it won't harm you- it won't. Beware when the scientific study come that proves it IS harmful :).
And then, scientific studies or not, here's what chicken do without them:
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/05/Chickens-Not-Fooled-by-GM-Crops.aspx


Didiydi
Posted 05 September 2009 at 03:38 am

I forgot to mention the "World according to Monsanto" video on youtube that has interviews with prominent scientists in the UK discovering harmful effects of GM potatoes I believe, on rats. And being fired from their jobs after disclosing the information to the public on BBC. We are living in a fast pace world, so you are right, watch where your information comes from. I don't trust any source that is widely available, such as Wikipedia, and could compromise big industries.


Virgil Syonid
Posted 05 September 2009 at 07:19 pm

cinndave said: "Poster #9 beat me to it. It’s true creationists have pointed to the banana as being designed by God just for us.

Well, why not? Just because you have to cross-breed two musa to get the perfect fruit doesn't make it any less of a 'perfect design' for consumption. Especially given the ridiculously primitive way in which it's accomplished. Try getting the 'perfect carphone' by taping your home phone into your sedan. ;)

Still, the theory of fruits being optimized for human consumption really doesn't explain coconuts... or pineapples. ;)

Genetic Modified Foods have so far had no significant destructive effect.

Tell that to the farmers in India whose GMO grain required so much water that they've sucked their water table down to the brine.

Or tell it to the Norwegians that wiped out a third of their arctic fisheries by using GMO krill.

Or look up the conditions Monsanto puts on the sale of their grains, which include a prohibition on scientific testing to scrutinize their claims about how well their products work. Even 'Scientific American' was crying foul on that one.

Unfortunately, pro-GMO research is funded at a 40:1 ratio to anti-GMO research (follow the money trails), and don't fool yourself into thinking that research results don't reflect the mandate of the institutions subsidizing them. Even if the best minds in the world were out to take on GMOs, they'd still be outgunned 40:1. Who's going to find 'scientific truth' buried in that morass?

You seriously mean that the holocaust didn’t have any nasty side effects?

I was talking about food eugenics, and being facetious to boot.

Creating _cancer_ in the species you are hacking around with, however, is quite easy.

A carcinogen is a cancer-causing agent. Select pesticide-enhanced grains have been shown in independent tests (some of which have already been mentioned in this forum) to cause carcinoma, meningioma, and other varieties of cancer. The latest batch of Frankenveggies are untested at best, dangerous at worst.

You expect 'safety' from the same crowd that rubber-stamped everything from DDT to benzoates to methylmercury?

Where you got this notion of a 'contagion', I'm not sure...?


famous1dave
Posted 06 September 2009 at 09:55 am

Evil Twin said: "Sex, bananas, naval oranges…what would Freud say!"

Nothing. He's dead.


rafgar
Posted 08 September 2009 at 11:10 am

A fine DamnInteresting article. Here's hoping for more. Though I confess, I'm now going to have nightmares about wanting a banana split after bananas have gone extinct.

Also, I feel compelled to point out that a great many popular fruits are cloned. One variety of grapes has been cloned from cuttings from a bush in the Middle East (Israel I think, but I'm not sure of that) for something like 1000 years.

Pluto said: "Well that certainly blows one creationist’s argument away."

What??? No, seriously, I fail to see the connection. What do people dinking with banana genetics have to do with creationism???


NtropiK
Posted 11 September 2009 at 10:10 am

rafgar: Creationists have argued that a banana is proof of Intelligent Design. No, really, I'm not kidding. The gist of the argument is that the shape is convenient to eat, it comes neatly packed, and you can tell from the outside if it is ripe. Therefore, god made it. Kind of like lollipops, which were also designed by god. Proponents of evolution, on the other hand, only talk of DNA, genetics, and other magic mumbo jumbo used to confuse you.


rev.felix
Posted 11 September 2009 at 05:58 pm

Well, that's not what I thought this article was going to be about. It was DI as always. This one isn't really a challenge to connect to pie, though.


Marc Boyd
Posted 11 September 2009 at 10:21 pm

STPH Translate: Shut The Pie Hole kid


DamnAwesome
Posted 17 September 2009 at 11:17 am

Hey everybody we're back and better than ever! Just kidding, we'll just post one or two articles and then abandon the site again. If you need us we'll be in Vegas, spending our book profits.


etienne
Posted 19 September 2009 at 09:11 am

#80 Hey stop whining, you should be glad they post. EVER. Do you realize how little content there is online? In fact, Im just going to shut my computer down until DI posts again. See you next year!


Virgil Syonid
Posted 20 September 2009 at 08:50 pm

*lol* @ #80.


jsmill
Posted 24 September 2009 at 07:07 pm

Ooohhh!
You guys are such teasers.
Get people hooked with fascinating stories and witty writing, string them out, give them just a little taste of the good stuff, then disappear back into the ether.
If I didn't love DI so much I'd go spare!


Ahuva
Posted 26 September 2009 at 04:01 am

I might be wrong, but from my several years reading DI, I think that around the Jewish High Holidays, articles always seemed to grind to a halt. I just assumed that Allen was busy with other things around this time.


Ripada
Posted 27 September 2009 at 07:57 pm

OK guys, did you post the couple of topics to tease us or are you really back? Feel free to include your fan base on what is really going on. I truly enjoy the reading but dislike the feeling of being unappreciated and kept out of the loop as a member.


cybrbeast
Posted 03 October 2009 at 07:43 am

Another month without an article. I really thought that after the book -which I bought two of, one as a gift- you would start writing articles again. At least give us an update on why nothing happens or let your guest writers make an article or two.


slighted
Posted 03 October 2009 at 05:59 pm

this was interesting a month ago..... when do the articles start coming in on a reg basis again?


guidette
Posted 04 October 2009 at 01:31 pm

Number 100! Yeah!
I had heard about the banana fungus and I've heard that there are bananas that taste amazing compared to the Cavandish ones. They are spraying the Cavandish bananas at an alarming rate--wash the outsides of them before peeling...
Interesting indeed.


iceburn2003
Posted 07 October 2009 at 06:23 pm

I had high hopes that after the book we would start seeing regular posts again, but it doesn't look that way. I am tired of coming here with no new articles. :(


Alan Bellows
Posted 08 October 2009 at 10:50 pm

To those complaining of the lack of new content: I apologize. I am experiencing some personal difficulties at the moment that are interfering with my ability to do anything that I normally take comfort in (including writing/editing/etc). I endeavor to peel away this bleak reality that has cocooned my psyche, but it is taking some time. Until then, updates will only come when I happen to have a bit of time, ambition, and joy all at the same time. Such synchronizations have become scarce.

Blah.


sir.xerces
Posted 09 October 2009 at 02:38 am

Alan Bellows said: "To those complaining of the lack of new content: I apologize. I am experiencing some personal difficulties at the moment that are interfering with my ability to do anything that I normally take comfort in (including writing/editing/etc). I endeavor to peel away this bleak reality that has cocooned my psyche, but it is taking some time. Until then, updates will only come when I happen to have a bit of time, ambition, and joy all at the same time. Such synchronizations have become scarce.

Blah."

Have no fear, the faithful are plentiful and pertinacious, and we appreciate all the amazing work you have done and are continuing to do - keep your chin up, and may fortune find you in its favour.


Ripada
Posted 09 October 2009 at 05:09 pm

Alan,
Patience is easier to achieve when informed, thanks for the update. I hope you find your happy place soon.
"The great path has no gates,
Thousands of roads enter it.
When one passes through this gateless gate
He walks freely between heaven and earth."


Anonymousx2
Posted 09 October 2009 at 07:44 pm

iceburn2003 said: "I had high hopes that after the book we would start seeing regular posts again, but it doesn’t look that way. I am tired of coming here with no new articles. :("

Have you bought the book yet? If not, please do so. We need to support this site.


Anonymousx2
Posted 09 October 2009 at 07:44 pm

cybrbeast said: "Another month without an article. I really thought that after the book -which I bought two of, one as a gift- you would start writing articles again. At least give us an update on why nothing happens or let your guest writers make an article or two."

Thanks for buying the book. You have the right to ask questions.


Anonymousx2
Posted 09 October 2009 at 07:45 pm

Ripada said: "OK guys, did you post the couple of topics to tease us or are you really back? Feel free to include your fan base on what is really going on. I truly enjoy the reading but dislike the feeling of being unappreciated and kept out of the loop as a member."

Please become a real member by buying the book.


Anonymousx2
Posted 09 October 2009 at 07:45 pm

slighted said: "this was interesting a month ago….. when do the articles start coming in on a reg basis again?"

Have you bought the book?


Anonymousx2
Posted 09 October 2009 at 07:49 pm

To all those who want new articles:

Have you considered writing your own articles and submitting them to Mr. Bellows for his consideration? I suspect that you will find that scholarly-yet-entertaining writing is more difficult than it appears.

And, finally, once again: Please buy the book if you have not already. Give the Brothers Bellows a reason to maintain this site.


Ripada
Posted 09 October 2009 at 10:59 pm

Anonymousx2 said: "Ripada said: “OK guys, did you post the couple of topics to tease us or are you really back? Feel free to include your fan base on what is really going on. I truly enjoy the reading but dislike the feeling of being unappreciated and kept out of the loop as a member.”

Please become a real member by buying the book."[/quote

I understand the basis of and agree with your comments. My point was only to ask for some sort of an update on what may or may not be happening with the site. I have my answer as it is and I am satisfied that the site still has the opportunity to flourish again when the Cosmos are in alignment. I did take a minute to thank him for his update as well as provide earnest wishes on his behalf.
I also understand that this is a free site devoid of any annoying (potentially money generating) ads to deal with (very cool). I do enjoy what has been provided to me without any effort on my part at all. Oh and yes, I have secured a copy for me and my family to enjoy during our solitude time in the windowless room, and it has been well received.


Anonymousx2
Posted 10 October 2009 at 04:51 am

Ripada said: "Oh and yes, I have secured a copy for me and my family to enjoy during our solitude time in the windowless room, and it has been well received."

That's great news. Thanks for being willing to part with a very little money to help support this site.

I can't speak for anyone else, but I found that holding the book instead of looking at a screen heightened the pleasure and experience of reading the articles.


Ahuva
Posted 10 October 2009 at 07:47 am

I completely agree with sir.xerces.


wclark
Posted 10 October 2009 at 07:25 pm

I heard that they won't post a new article until the number of people complaining in the comments reaches 200. Where's our new article, monkeys?! Dance! Dance, monkeys!


etienne
Posted 11 October 2009 at 08:29 am

Anonymousx2

Nice spam there. Have you bought the book? Wow thats rich, yeah I think most of us have and really, is that the problem? Book not selling? No new articles until X book sales reached? Is your last name bellows by any chance? Bad habits return as always.

"but I found that holding the book instead of looking at a screen heightened the pleasure and experience of reading the articles."

Ok now I know youre being sarcastic! How about if you put the book in your pants and take 5 valiums, youll fall asleep and DREAM your own articles! This works people, try it!


darren.l
Posted 11 October 2009 at 01:07 pm

Just want to say that I had the book bought by my Wife for me for my birthday, and it is excellent!
Nice one Guys!

D.


Anonymousx2
Posted 12 October 2009 at 06:49 am

etienne said: "Anonymousx2
Nice spam there. Have you bought the book? Wow thats rich, yeah I think most of us have and really, is that the problem? Book not selling? No new articles until X book sales reached? Is your last name bellows by any chance? Bad habits return as always.
“but I found that holding the book instead of looking at a screen heightened the pleasure and experience of reading the articles.”
Ok now I know youre being sarcastic! How about if you put the book in your pants and take 5 valiums, youll fall asleep and DREAM your own articles! This works people, try it!"

Spam? You've lost me. Each one of my posts is individual.
No, I am not Mr. Bellows. From what I have seen, Mr. Bellows would never think of promoting the book here. He has more class than that.
No, I was not being sarcastic. I am of the book generation, as are quite a few of us who visit this site. I know full well that the book as a medium is most likely doomed, especially when the Kindle finally becomes truly easy to use. Until that time, though, I will continue to enjoy the sensory experience of reading words on wood pulp or, even better, rag content.


Eduardo
Posted 13 October 2009 at 01:49 pm

Has anybody considered that instead of whining about the lack of content on the site we, the readers, could submit articles of our own for Mr Bellows' approval? This would seem to solve all problems. I know it is easier said than done, but it could work. Is this possible, Mr Bellows?


etienne
Posted 13 October 2009 at 03:19 pm

Ugh, between getting ignored by the creators of this site and the mindless drones that defend it, Ive had it. Bookmark deleted after many, many years. Thanks for the good times, too bad its been so long since things were smooth, I feel like an abused spouse.

/Delete


Jason Bellows
Posted 13 October 2009 at 07:34 pm

We have a couple of articles written. Once we get Damn Alan to approve the Damn Articles they'll be up.

In the meantime, I try to post interesting bits to the Damn Interesting twitter ...


toxicroach
Posted 15 October 2009 at 01:46 pm

The months and months and months between articles is just ridiculous. What is the holdup? I love this site, but at this point it's been what, a year since the site was properly tended too? And that with trying to hawk products.

Ya'll need to get it together or just retire the site altogether.


prytol
Posted 16 October 2009 at 11:27 am

Free site. I just enjoy what I get. Can't get greedy when I am not paying. :)


Anonymousx2
Posted 17 October 2009 at 06:58 am

toxicroach said: "The months and months and months between articles is just ridiculous. What is the holdup? I love this site, but at this point it’s been what, a year since the site was properly tended too? And that with trying to hawk products.
Ya’ll need to get it together or just retire the site altogether."

And exactly how many articles have you submitted for their consideration, and exactly how much money have you donated to the Brothers Bellows so that they can continue this site?

No matter what country you call home, I hope that you do not represent the average person in your age group, and I hope that the rest of your family is not like you.


Coramoor
Posted 17 October 2009 at 08:53 am

Thank you so much for the wonderful articles! Hope you'll be able to write again soon. I look forward to a new article!

To the people who complain about the lack of updates: just remove the bookmark, go live your life. Maybe one day someone will send you an article from DI and you'll go, "Oh, I used to visit that site." DI isn't supported by advertising, so it doesn't matter if you don't visit. No one owes you a DI article.


Stead311
Posted 17 October 2009 at 09:11 am

Anonymousx2 said:
And exactly how many articles have you submitted for their consideration, and exactly how much money have you donated to the Brothers Bellows so that they can continue this site?

I have done both. You need not know how much I have donated or how many articles I have submitted. All you really need to know is that I have done both. However, irrespective of that fact, I still must maintain the authors of this site has an obligation imposed by the motion they have set before themselves to live up to the integrity of this site. Why create something only to keep it in a suspended state of disrepair? I find it is incipiently at least and often explicitly irresponsible. However, that being said, I do respect them and I do understand that things are not always as easy as they seem. But why have they not reached out to the hundreds of supporters who COULD offer their time or skill which would greatly benefit the site?


d
Posted 17 October 2009 at 03:39 pm

where did that page go that listed everyebody who donated i think i donated money to you guy s acouple of years ago but i'm not certain

anyways the lack of updates for articles is quite annoying


Partario
Posted 18 October 2009 at 06:13 pm

It would be nice if all the selfish whining people went away and stopped demanding more content from the good folk at Damn Interesting. DI owes you nothing. Stop whining like spoiled brat kids. How about showing some appreciation for the free content you've had for so long, and getting off the Bellows' backs? They'll get around to publishing more content when it suits them, and not when a bunch of whiny jerks tell them to. Kee-rist. If I was a Bellows brother, I'd be sorely tempted to throw in the towel after reading some of the garbage demanding more content. How about acting like adults and cutting them some slack?


jude3500
Posted 18 October 2009 at 08:48 pm

It's killing me that this site is not kept up... I understand what others are saying about the creators, their time and it being free is very nice. But, before I click on my favorites on "damn interesting" I say a little prayer that a new image populates instead of that damn aweful bananna! For about a year I was itching for a new article, read all the others already posted that interested me already, and now I'm teased with just a handful articles all posted in a short period of time... and then nothing again for over 2 months. Please make a decision- I don't mind if you shut down the site... it will save my sanity since I can no longer deal with that bananna which laughs and taunts me!


Anonymousx2
Posted 19 October 2009 at 02:46 am

Partario said: "... How about acting like adults and cutting them some slack?"

Partario: I taught high school and college for thirty-three years, and I can assure you that most of the posters on this site are either middle or late adolescents. Their behavior is in keeping with their present state of development; I'm sure that the Brothers Bellows are well aware of this and are willing to be understanding, even though it must be a tad bit aggravating.


sir.xerces
Posted 19 October 2009 at 02:56 pm

jude3500 said: "...I can no longer deal with that bananna which laughs and taunts me!"

I scowl at that picture almost every day...


prytol
Posted 20 October 2009 at 10:30 am

There are many of the older articles that I have not read. When I need a fix, I hit the random story button and it is new to me. The history of this site is usually about 1 new article every 4-6 months. I enjoy what there is and if the site was to go away, I would miss it. What I want to know is what can be done to improve the server (I get unable to connect error often these days)? If a payment of $15 year would keep the site going with a new article every month, then I would pay.


Denvergal
Posted 20 October 2009 at 02:46 pm

Partario said: "It would be nice if all the selfish whining people went away and stopped demanding more content from the good folk at Damn Interesting. DI owes you nothing. Stop whining like spoiled brat kids. How about showing some appreciation for the free content you’ve had for so long, and getting off the Bellows’ backs? They’ll get around to publishing more content when it suits them, and not when a bunch of whiny jerks tell them to. Kee-rist. If I was a Bellows brother, I’d be sorely tempted to throw in the towel after reading some of the garbage demanding more content. How about acting like adults and cutting them some slack?"

I couldn't agree more. I will wait for as long as it takes to get new articles....in the meantime the "random article" button is a wonderful thing. DI you are great, don't let the people who expect everything to be just as they want it, when they want it get you down.


Kapuski
Posted 21 October 2009 at 01:53 am

What I don't understand is that how come there are not more writers on this site? I don't know how this site is managed but I bet there are hundreads of people here who could have something interesting to tell.


alanmcclean
Posted 21 October 2009 at 05:45 am

I think anybody foolish enough to donate money to this webpage should feel outraged at the lack of willingness of the creators/authors to update it.


Eduardo
Posted 22 October 2009 at 02:48 am

Kapuski said: "What I don’t understand is that how come there are not more writers on this site? I don’t know how this site is managed but I bet there are hundreads of people here who could have something interesting to tell."

I agree. Whichever side of the ongoing debate you follow; you cannot deny either of these points.

1) The site is woefully maintained.
and;

2) We, the readers and critics, do nothing about that. (Other than complain about the site, or defend it.)
Why not either submit articles ourselves, or vote with our cyberfeet? Enough apathy.
Either submit an article, or cease and desist. Put up, or shut up.
And to the Bellows', is this where you want your site, and fans, headed?


mrbungle
Posted 22 October 2009 at 06:28 am

Hmmm, I find the lack of new articles very frustrating and have done for about a year now. From the comments a lot of people agree with me. Well, at least all the grumbling must be very encouraging for the authors and owners of the site as it is confirmation they write excellent content.

Also, they should monetize the site in some small way. I'm not taking flashing, dancing banner ads, but maybe some subtle google ads down one side might help pay for more updates.


iceburn2003
Posted 22 October 2009 at 10:04 am

I agree that they need to put some advertisements on the site. It is silly to be throwing away all of this traffic.

Eduardo said: "Kapuski said: “2) We, the readers and critics, do nothing about that. (Other than complain about the site, or defend it.)
Why not either submit articles ourselves, or vote with our cyberfeet? Enough apathy.
Either submit an article, or cease and desist. Put up, or shut up.
And to the Bellows’, is this where you want your site, and fans, headed?"

From what I have seen in posts from Jason Bellows it sounds like they have a collection of articles ready to go, they are just waiting for Alan's approval to post them to the site...


Ron
Posted 23 October 2009 at 09:33 am

I agree with the ad idea, it will bring in revenue and can be done tastefully. Though I would prefer they only advertise for online porn sites to give me some eye candy while I read.


sir.xerces
Posted 23 October 2009 at 11:06 am

omg, you guys don't get it.

Alan Bellows said: "

Putting ads on a site it is akin to beating it with an ugly stick. But that stick’s not just ugly, it’s distracting and information-diluting. I don’t like seeing ads on other sites, so I can’t put them on this one in good conscience.

So far donations have covered our hosting bills most of the time, and we have some plans to get something back for our efforts without resorting to the obnoxious. Thanks for caring enough to make suggestions, but for this project, ad-based revenue is not an option.
"

everything you've read here is mirrored somewhere else on the internet, but it's so very rare to find a decent site that provides quality content without compromising their standards - the neat format and interesting articles are what made DI great in the first place.
So be patient and have faith in the site you still visit on a regular basis...


Flammadeao
Posted 24 October 2009 at 01:10 pm

I'd like to put in another vote for ads. Yes, they're not the ideal solution, but it's something to work with right now. I also feel as though it can be done tastefully, and doesn't have to be overly intrusive.


tunapez
Posted 27 October 2009 at 08:29 am

How's about you show your support by going out and buying the book? It is a great volume of the humorous ilk found on the site, IRL! I'm bummed the cyber-edition has slowed considerably, but I would be remiss to think I am ENTITLED to a new article every week or month. Go into the archives and read the past articles, can anyone say they've read them all? If so, how about twice? Surely they are DI enough to read again if you need a fix that bad? I'm sure these guys have lives, families, jobs ... until there's a subscription required, I think we get what we get and like it. Period.

BTW, a future article on Thomas Midgely, Jr's arch-nemesis, Clair Patterson, could be DI!
Nudge, nudge, wink, wink.


Anteater
Posted 29 October 2009 at 09:28 am

Isn't there a shelf life for banana articles?


kissaki
Posted 29 October 2009 at 02:41 pm

Just bought the book, can't wait to read it! Thank you DI crew for some of the most fascinating SFW content on the web. I am patiently looking forward to the next article. In the meantime Alan, I wish you lot's of luck as you "peel away this bleak reality that has cocooned" your psyche. For that, I recommend a slice of pie with a Thorazine chaser.


Anonymousx2
Posted 29 October 2009 at 04:42 pm

kissaki:

kissaki said: "Just bought the book, can’t wait to read it! Thank you DI crew for some of the most fascinating SFW content on the web. I am patiently looking forward to the next article. In the meantime Alan, I wish you lot’s of luck as you “peel away this bleak reality that has cocooned” your psyche. For that, I recommend a slice of pie with a Thorazine chaser."

kissaki: Blessings be upon thee for supporting this site, for not complaining, and for showing concern for Mr. Bellow.


Anthropositor
Posted 31 October 2009 at 06:27 pm

I am now raising meat rabbits on Shmooo, banana's with the skin, mixed grains with molasses, grass, weeds and clover. Each of the rabbits eat roughly a half banana per day. It took them a few days to warm up to the idea, since they had been raised prior to my getting them on nothing but rabbit pellets. They also eat orange peels with pulp and the cores of a variety of fruits with varying enthusiasm. The staple of their diet is Shmooo.


jordopia
Posted 02 November 2009 at 08:49 am

tunapez said: "How’s about you show your support by going out and buying the book? It is a great volume of the humorous ilk found on the site, IRL! I’m bummed the cyber-edition has slowed considerably, but I would be remiss to think I am ENTITLED to a new article every week or month. Go into the archives and read the past articles, can anyone say they’ve read them all? If so, how about twice? Surely they are DI enough to read again if you need a fix that bad? I’m sure these guys have lives, families, jobs … until there’s a subscription required, I think we get what we get and like it. Period.

BTW, a future article on Thomas Midgely, Jr’s arch-nemesis, Clair Patterson, could be DI!
Nudge, nudge, wink, wink."

Great call on the Clair Patterson article. He's a hero of mine. There should be a holiday in his honour.


spontastic
Posted 03 November 2009 at 04:52 pm

Ive got a way we could keep the destruction of these bannanas, we put them in sealed greenhouses. We take a large field like say stadium size and put a dome over it. Then we make certain anyone with the plantation disease upon thier body does not eneter this area. We may also need animals inside of the dome to use up the oxygen that is created by the massive amount of trees, or find another way to convert the oxygen to carbondioxide without having to bring new air into the system. Also i was wondering if the previous type of bannanas has gone completely out of existance. If so thats too bad i would have like to try it, if not why dont we use this idea of a closed environment to create more of these bannanas :?


Anthropositor
Posted 04 November 2009 at 06:26 pm

Sealed habitats for farming projects have a variety of problems. They are incredibly expensive. A complex and challenging example showing the scope of the problem would be Biosphere 2. This project did go on for more than two decades, and admittedly the goals were considerably more ambitious and challenging than isolating one particular crop endangered by disease.

But the enclosure of Biosphere 2 was only a little over three acres. First, that would not produce many bananas compared to demand. Perhaps one slice of banana per consumer per year, at a possible cost of $2 per slice. You can play with the numbers if you want. Figure about $10,000,000 per year for construction and maintenance. Then figure out the upper limit of production if everything worked out ideally. Then recognize that it is exceedingly unlikely that things will work out anything close to ideally.

Biosphere 2 failed in a whole lot of interesting ways. But still, it failed. Hermetically sealed farming of food crops in high worldwide demand is never likely to become a viable approach.


Mjolnir
Posted 05 November 2009 at 12:07 pm

On the previous version of this site, all the article IDs were numeric and you could change them in the URL. There are a pile of articles that are either ready or near-ready from several authors. I read the killdozer and banana articles back during Alan's last long hiatus. Dunno why it takes 4 months to finish one....


thedevilsdoormat
Posted 06 November 2009 at 03:11 am

Hey Alan,

Just wanted to thank you for all the time and effort you've put into this website. I've pretty much read through the entire site and really appreciate what you've done and that you've had the courage to keep this website advertisement free (even though you probably could have made a bit of money from this thing).

There are not many people with principles left; it's rare to actually find one.

I hope you feel better soon, mate.


sir.xerces
Posted 08 November 2009 at 08:14 am

@ thedevilsdoormat:

agreed.


SGFAZ
Posted 11 November 2009 at 11:34 am

I was puled in by the "Sex Life of a Banana".
Who knew fruit had sex?


zippyy
Posted 15 November 2009 at 04:24 pm

Since there has been no new content for a while here is an article that I found DI
"$150 million Jungle Jackpot"
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10590844


Floj
Posted 16 November 2009 at 10:06 am

I miss you guys and your damn interesting content. I learned of Tesla's awesomeness and that the American standards Champion toilet can flush some 40 golf balls in a single 1.3 gallon flush. Perhaps someday a new Pie of Damn Interesting Knowledge will again be placed in the oven.


Floj
Posted 16 November 2009 at 10:07 am

Pistol said: "ohh yeah,

mmmmmmm pie."

hahaha you have no idea how awesome it is to see that still here!


drewski_brewski
Posted 17 November 2009 at 11:33 am

Aww, I check and check, and still no article. I even bought the book. I'm going to assume the fetal position now, rock gently back and forth, and whimper until a new article is posted. If anyone needs me, I'll be under the desk.


Coffee For the Admiral
Posted 17 November 2009 at 03:35 pm

Okay, so I'm another long-time lurker who has decloaked in a crisis. I'm eagerly awaiting notification from Barnes & Noble that my copy of the book is available for pickup, so I'm official.

Also, big thanks to all the commenters on DI for making the comments just as readable as the articles. This is the only site where I read all the comments, usually without wanting to beat someone senseless-er.

Finally, I should probably comment on the actual article. You know you have problems with anxiety with things like this freak you out. I was all "Ohmygodtherewillbenobananaswhatinheckwillwedo" etc. I enjoy bananas as much as the next individual, but I really hope scientists put cancer ahead of bananas on the "Stuff to Fix" list.


Virgil Syonid
Posted 18 November 2009 at 12:22 pm

My vote is URL change to: http://www.damnbanana.com

Hmm. I wonder if there already is a damnbanana.com?


nislo
Posted 20 November 2009 at 01:18 pm

1st!!! Ohhh wait....


captain2obvious
Posted 21 November 2009 at 07:21 pm

Virgil Syonid said: "My vote is URL change to: http://www.damnbanana.com

Hmm. I wonder if there already is a damnbanana.com?"

LOL I just registered to say the exact same thing


DeLuzional
Posted 26 November 2009 at 05:00 am

Happy Thanksgiving everyone. Thinking about you Allan...;)


DeLuzional
Posted 26 November 2009 at 05:01 am

DeLuzional said: "Happy Thanksgiving everyone. Thinking about you Allan…;)"

Alan*.....sheesh!


indigo-angel
Posted 27 November 2009 at 11:12 pm

thanks DA! this stuff came up as a question in my scholarship exam... owe you one!


Bacardi
Posted 30 November 2009 at 06:08 am

One hundred and fifty-FIRST!
Miss your writing, Alan.


sachse
Posted 03 December 2009 at 12:54 pm

damn banana...I bought the durn book Al...c'mon, lets get it started


MacAvity
Posted 03 December 2009 at 08:34 pm

Sorry, this is completely off topic, but how do you who have them get the little pictures next to your names?


sh0cktopus
Posted 03 December 2009 at 10:26 pm

@MacAvity - go to http://www.gravatar.com and you're on your way


angryratman
Posted 04 December 2009 at 08:42 am

So how exactly is selective breeding any different from genetic modification??? Can someone explain pls?


Reaper
Posted 07 December 2009 at 01:50 pm

Selective breeding is the process of asking Mother Nature to give you certain characteristics. Genetic engineering is the process of bypassing Mother Nature and shoehorning a characteristic into an object. Using selective breeding to make a big dog takes years of breeding big dogs to other big dogs. Doing it with GE (at the moment) amounts to finding and switching on various big dog genes in an egg/sperm, impregnating a dog, and hoping to Christ that you don't get a viral superdog that can blight bananas into extinction.


captain2obvious
Posted 07 December 2009 at 11:05 pm

Reaper said: "Selective breeding is the process of asking Mother Nature to give you certain characteristics. Genetic engineering is the process of bypassing Mother Nature and shoehorning a characteristic into an object. Using selective breeding to make a big dog takes years of breeding big dogs to other big dogs. Doing it with GE (at the moment) amounts to finding and switching on various big dog genes in an egg/sperm, impregnating a dog, and hoping to Christ that you DO get a viral superdog that can blight bananas into extinction."


captain2obvious
Posted 07 December 2009 at 11:05 pm

fixed it for you lol


DeLuzional
Posted 08 December 2009 at 06:15 am

captain2obvious said: "fixed it for you lol"

ummm.....maybe if I have another cup of coffee?


Virgil Syonid
Posted 08 December 2009 at 09:25 pm

DeLuzional said: "captain2obvious said: “fixed it for you lol”
ummm…..maybe if I have another cup of coffee?"

He's pointing out the sad reality that there are more $$ in viral superdogs than plain ol' "big dogs".

Just think: after $2 trillion worth of scratching their butts in Afghanistan, the US military will finally use that viral superdog to sniff out Bin Laden and save us all.


angryratman
Posted 09 December 2009 at 05:48 am

So it's just a sped up version of selective breeding and hence, the same.

Whatever the spooky apocalyptic outcomes of GM we cannot survive without. It's a fact that we cannot sustain a population of 9billion using normal food production techniques.


DeLuzional
Posted 09 December 2009 at 10:13 pm

Virgil Syonid said: "DeLuzional said: “captain2obvious said: “fixed it for you lol”
ummm…..maybe if I have another cup of coffee?”
He’s pointing out the sad reality that there are more $$ in viral superdogs than plain ol’ “big dogs”.
Just think: after $2 trillion worth of scratching their butts in Afghanistan, the US military will finally use that viral superdog to sniff out Bin Laden and save us all."

Thank you. Damn black hearts and greenbacks....we should go back to trading salt..:)


wclark
Posted 10 December 2009 at 11:11 am

@161angryratman - it's not the same. Not all (re-)combinations of genetic material are possible through selective breeding, so it's conceivable that GM could produce something that would never result through a more natural process. That's the worry. It may or may not be a well-founded worry (maybe GM will never result in anything more dangerous than what selective breeding could produce anyway) but the two are very different processes that are capable of producing different results.


angryratman
Posted 11 December 2009 at 03:44 am

OK. Fair point but it's fair to say they are a lot more similar than most people would care to realise.

I honestly don't see why people are so terrified of GM. They're probably eating it and they don't even know. Sweet irony.


wclark
Posted 11 December 2009 at 12:31 pm

True enough about some people worrying too much. Some kinds of GM are probably harmless, such as copying traits from different cultivars of the same species. It's things like copying genes for bioluminescence from an insect and putting them into a vegetable that worry me. Like most politically-charged topics, I think too many people on both sides are taking things to an extreme. Pro-GM folks need to recognize that there are genuine dangers with what they're proposing and that proper safeguards are in order, and the anti-GM folks need to recognize that technology isn't always evil and can even help with problems like world hunger, environmental degradation, etc.


DeLuzional
Posted 12 December 2009 at 05:25 am

Used to eat my GM quite often, believe me we both knew it!.....LOL


Anonymousx2
Posted 13 December 2009 at 06:19 am

This is becoming really interesting - checking in every day to see if a new article has been posted. I wonder how long it will be? Because I am a person who likes to see records broken, I am kind of hoping that the previous lapse of six months is exceeded.

More than that, though, I hope that Mr. Castle and the Brothers Bellows are okay.


korbor
Posted 15 December 2009 at 02:11 pm

I used to check this site constantly for its great writing and damn interesting stories. I was also considering purchasing the book, however since the operators of this site have completely neglected the site and no new content has appeared in months and that doesn't seem like it will change any time soon. I will not only not be purchasing this book but I am also not going to visit this site anymore. You neglected your base of support which is the site not your book. Good job boys.


kissaki
Posted 15 December 2009 at 02:13 pm

Finished "Alien Hand Syndrome". It was a great read and I will be loaning it to my brother this weekend. Good job DI! Looking forward to a restart on the articles when you are ready.


Anonymousx2
Posted 16 December 2009 at 03:54 am

Korbor:

I sincerely doubt that you would have ever bought the book. If you liked the writing as much as you claim, you would have bought the book already.


SIMDUDE
Posted 16 December 2009 at 04:25 pm

Oh bananas! Still no new posts.


tednugentkicksass
Posted 17 December 2009 at 02:09 am

Anonymousx2 said: "I hope that Mr. Castle and the Brothers Bellows are okay."

I'm pretty sure it's "Bellows & Son", not "Brothers Bellows"... but my sentiments exactly. (Except that 6 month nonsense-- I want content now.)


cybrbeast
Posted 17 December 2009 at 08:59 am

This is getting ridiculous. We know from the previous site that there are articles that are very close to finished. Why not post them until you get out of whatever is troubling you? I have bought another one of the books as a Christmas gift, but the people I've given books to are also wondering why the site is dead.


bananaman
Posted 17 December 2009 at 09:17 pm

Virgil Syonid said: "My vote is URL change to: http://www.damnbanana.com

Hmm. I wonder if there already is a damnbanana.com?"

there is now!
check it:
http://www.damnbanana.com


Eduardo
Posted 18 December 2009 at 12:43 am

I agree with Bananaman and Korbor. Enough is enough, or in this case, too little is too little. To preemptively defend my opinion; yes, I have bought the book, I have suggested many ways the site could be improved. Further, I am tired of the argument....."It's free, enjoy what is given to you, and don't complain." or similar. It is becoming increasingly evident that this site began as a whimsy, and then became an advertisement for the book. The book has (presumably) sold well, and the site has since been neglected. We, the readers, bought and recommended the book, and we deserve better treatment. This is not, and has not been for a long time, an altruistic endeavour. Enough faux loyalty. Post or lose customers (once called readers.).


Obfuscatory Transparency
Posted 18 December 2009 at 03:06 pm

bananaman said: "Virgil Syonid said: “My vote is URL change to: http://www.damnbanana.com

Hmm. I wonder if there already is a damnbanana.com?”

there is now!check it:http://www.damnbanana.com"

Immpressive, but you are not a website, yet!


Anonymousx2
Posted 19 December 2009 at 06:33 am

Eduardo:

You might very well be right, and I hope you are.

I am sick to death of everyone on the Internet expecting everything for free. I imagine that many of these same people also expect doctors, attorneys, and CPAs to work either for free or for a greatly reduced fee. That's not the way life and economies work. Accept it.

Maybe the Misters Bellows and Mr. Castle did use this site to help push sales of their book. Great! I am a firm believer that people should pay for services and content.

As for what we "deserve," the answer is nothing. If they publish another book, I'll buy it, just as I did with books, newspapers, and (yes) albums in the old days before the Internet encouraged people to think that all printed information and music should be free.


Tink
Posted 20 December 2009 at 02:48 pm

Whoopee! Got my autographed copy of Alien Hand yesterday, just in time for my B-day tomorrow. Sweet! Thank , thank you, Alan, Jason and all the writers that made my wish come true. Ya'll will all-ways be the most awesome people in this gals cyber world. Hugs and best wishes for a Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah etc. and a fabulous New Year!


Bacardi
Posted 21 December 2009 at 12:14 pm

Anonymousx2,...you should have added,.."And you damned kids get off my lawn!"
:P


Anonymousx2
Posted 21 December 2009 at 05:30 pm

Bacardi said: "Anonymousx2,…you should have added,..”And you damned kids get off my lawn!”
:P"

Along with a "Dadgum it, you young whippersnappers," I assume?


Jason Bellows
Posted 23 December 2009 at 01:33 pm

If I could make anything happen on this site, I would point you all here: http://www.damninteresting.com/the-christmas-truce-of-1914


Jason Bellows
Posted 23 December 2009 at 01:35 pm

Tink said: "Whoopee! Got my autographed copy of Alien Hand yesterday, just in time for my B-day tomorrow. Sweet! Thank , thank you, Alan, Jason and all the writers that made my wish come true. Ya’ll will all-ways be the most awesome people in this gals cyber world. Hugs and best wishes for a Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah etc. and a fabulous New Year!"

I remember signing yours ... Alan, Bryan and I had all met for dinner, and were desperately trying to keep buffalo sauce from the pages. Ah, those were other days.


Kejawa
Posted 23 December 2009 at 02:24 pm

I have been reading DI for a couple of years now and have made my way through the archives. I just picked up a copy of the book for myself and one for a Christmas gift for my dad. Thanks DI, I can't wait to pour through it.

I haven't bothered to register because I never have much to add that the articles or the subsequent posts don't cover so there wasn't really a point to it. I finally registered to post this comment in order to weigh in on the ongoing "lack of articles" discussion. Nobody "deserves" anything from the brothers and if there is never another article I will still remember the site fondly because, well, it is truly Damn Interesting.

I would like to echo the suggestion that maybe the reigns get turned over to parties that will keep the site going. I am sure it would make all of us readers happier, and it would continue to advertise the book. Seems like a win win to me.

I am a long time Guns n' Roses fan. Great band with great music and damn interesting personalities. Unfortunately Axl had to have things just so and the rest is history. Several of the other members formed Velvet Revolver. Another good band that had some of the same feel and an obvious tie back to the original name. Maybe those of you who keep suggesting topics for articles can take a crack at it. Maybe a new site "über interesting" will take shape.

Till then...


Tink
Posted 23 December 2009 at 03:55 pm

Jason Bellows said: "If I could make anything happen on this site, I would point you all here: http://www.damninteresting.com/the-christmas-truce-of-1914"

Ha! Now I know why my book smelled like ribs, lol.

Here ya go honey:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eysUcfdAszQ


mmmscott
Posted 27 December 2009 at 10:28 pm

A belated Happy Holidays to everyone at Damn Interesting! The two books I gave as Christmas presents have already been thoroughly enjoyed. Hope you all can come back soon!


J.K.
Posted 27 December 2009 at 10:50 pm

Damn I miss the Interesting posts here, but at least the comments section is alive.

I think Eduardo was being a bit extreme a few dozen posts back, but he has a bit of a right though to still be annoyed. The site definitely was updated with the promise of more materials and in support of the book. We've been still staring at the story of lab horny bananas since August which was 4 months ago. Kejawa had a good point there, something should be done perhaps like what went down with GnR->Velvet Revolver. Jason a few posts ago before Christmas linked up the old WW1 Christmas truce, seems he would have even liked the permissions to link an oldie but a goodie up for the holidays and couldn't. I recall Matt also wanted to update again as well after the banana lovin' so really you got 2 of the 3 primary staff wanting to carry on. Maybe there is a need for an “über interesting” website to carry forward, or at least get the permissions changed so other staff can keep it alive and let Alan retire in peace where people will leave him alone and stop bitching.


SIMDUDE
Posted 28 December 2009 at 04:20 pm

DAMN IRRITATING


haffa
Posted 29 December 2009 at 03:19 am

In the damninteresting article "The Last Great Steam Car", Alan Bellow mentions this site called "Interesting Thing of the Day" http://itotd.com . If you're hungry for articles, scoot over there and have a semester long fiesta, instead of hanging about here, bellyaching.

But I understand completely. The comments section here is the best thing, with all the good thoughtfull comments, and you don't find that level of intellect in the comments section on other sites. Not to mention the "you are a moron, and you can [insert random senseless action of masochism] because I am of a different opinion" type of comments that the rest of the internet is pestered by. Kejawa's sugestion is good.


First!!
Posted 29 December 2009 at 01:10 pm

FIRST!!


Flatfoot1954
Posted 29 December 2009 at 03:13 pm

Okay, so, we haven't seen a DI post since last August. What happened guys? Lose your Damn Interest? We miss you. We miss DI. (gripe-gripe, bellyache-bellyache)


rainmaker
Posted 29 December 2009 at 07:35 pm

hi y'all
I just registered, but I've read like 99.99% of the archives("server unavailable" excluded a couple), so I hope this hasn't already been covered. I found the "Snow-Motor" from 1926 in a couple of places and thought it was D.I. go to... http://oilpunk.com/ & under categories select -history(8) scroll down to snow motor from 1926 & play the LIVELEAK vid. Or, http://www.notechmagazine.com/page/9/; might also be @http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/. Btw there's a bit other of D.I. stuff at these sites...
I too, am anxiously awaiting a new post from the Bellows clan, their writing is excellent,witty,informative,etc.
This site brings together a myriad of D.I. topics from far & wide, compiling it all, right here, for our enjoyment & really, nothing is asked in return. IMHO ya shouldn't look a gift horse in the teeth/mouth.
Thank you & happy holidays/Best wishes to the D.I. staff
J.W.


forester
Posted 30 December 2009 at 03:20 pm

I have recently purchassed the DI book and i am enjoying it greatly and has made my enjoyment of DI far better.


rp2
Posted 04 January 2010 at 03:37 am

I wasn't going to do anything about it, but seeing as it is a few days into the near year and no one else has caught on...

2010 FIRST!!!


kchapps
Posted 09 January 2010 at 04:00 pm

Ok, write a new fucking article, or get rid of the site.


kchapps
Posted 09 January 2010 at 04:01 pm

p.s. purchased the book, and have been a long time reader of the site. It took the most recent unexplained hiatus for me to actually register and post.


Jason Bellows
Posted 09 January 2010 at 08:36 pm

kchapps said: "Ok, write a new fucking article, or get rid of the site."

Is that a banana sex pun?


empty-drawer
Posted 09 January 2010 at 10:15 pm

Jason Bellows said: "kchapps said: “Ok, write a new fucking article, or get rid of the site.”
Is that a banana sex pun?"

definitely a banana sex pun.
Still.. I cry a little bit every time I see that banana staring me down...


Daemon
Posted 10 January 2010 at 05:24 am

Rather than swear at the brothers Bellows, how about we just plead and beg for the site control to be handed to Jason who obviously still checks the site!


haffa
Posted 11 January 2010 at 07:47 am

Agreed: please, please I plead and beg that the control of the site gets handed over to or at least shared with Jason Bellows


wclark
Posted 11 January 2010 at 01:04 pm

200th!


Next page of comments →
Add Your Comment

Note: Your email address will not be published, shared, spammed, or otherwise mishandled. Anonymous comments are more likely to be held for moderation. You can optionally register or login.

You may use basic formatting HTML such as <i>, <b>, and <blockquote>.