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There is group of people in the world who are against human conception. There are too many people, they argue, and we’re killing the ecosystem. It’s either the ecosystem or us, and they are voting against us. They want us to end the human race.

It isn’t a call for genocide, nor is it a call to end lives currently in place. Instead they are attempting to convince the current human populous to stop breeding for the good of the planet.

I spent hours reading the VHEMT (pronounced vehement) site, and find their intentions to be mostly good, just the evidence is lacking. I even have some sympathy for the movement; I don’t think that humanity needs to end, but there does seem to be way too many of us. If you doubt, check out a suburban highway at 5:30 PM, or visit DinseyWorld on a holiday weekend. I especially like the table of reasons people breed. However, the site fails in making the case that humans are the cause of extinctions and environmental calamities.

From their site:

“In the few million years we’ve been here, we have … emerged as the most powerful species. In fact, this has happened just in the last 10,000 years. Our ability to alter massive amounts of Earth’s surface has only existed a short time. Nuclear weapons aren’t much older than I am. Nonetheless, in spite of these minuscule amounts of time these changes have occurred in, they seem to be too much for large portions of the planet.

Can we morally justify destroying life forms which have taken billions of years to evolve? Sure, others will come along to take their places, but that seems like saying it’s alright to kill someone because 389,000 more are born on an average day.

I don’t think we have the right to cause even one species to involuntarily go extinct. This is a paradox, however, since the crab louse and a couple dozen other species, will become extinct when we do. A tragic loss.”

I’m certain extinctions wouldn’t end with humanity gone. I’m fairly sure that the Earth’s climate won’t become static, and all life will continue into infinitum without us. As far as we know, we are the only pocket of life in the universe. Instead of dropping out of the race to allow the other wonders of nature to continue, shouldn’t we fight to safeguard the only oasis of life we know?

VHEMT website